Rethinking US Development Policy

The Rethinking US Development Policy Blog complements CGD's Rethinking US Development Policy initiative. Both are for professionals interested in tracking US development policy and its impact on developing countries.

 

The State Department/USAID 2015 QDDR: We Already Do That

Are our foreign affairs agencies prepared to mitigate threats to global security and advance US interests?  That’s the central question the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) must answer.  And although the report is filled (literally, filled) with ideas for small improvements, there’s little in it that (a) identifies the reasons State and USAID are falling demonstrably short of the admirable ambitions outlined in the report, and (b) offers real, and sufficiently grand, solutions for addressing them. 

Time for US to Ramp Up Efforts on Domestic Resource Mobilization

At the World Bank and IMF’s Spring Meetings last week there was much discussion around 0.7 — that decades-old target whereby donors should provide aid equal to 0.7% of their GDP. But there’s a much more current and strategic conversation happening around 0.07% — the amount of assistance donors provide to improve domestic resource mobilization in developing countries. This rounding error goes toward high-impact efforts like improving revenue collection and customs capacity in developing countries.

Ben Leo Testifies on Modernizing the US Approach to Promoting Economic Engagement in Africa

In testimony last week before the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy, CGD’s Ben Leo called upon Congress to modernize how the United States supports economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa. The hearing was called to reflect on the progress since the August 2014 US-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington and to address obstacles that continue to discourage greater private-sector engagement in the region.

Telling the Story of MCC’s Compacts in a New Way

Now that MCC has completed 18 compacts worth over $6 billion, many stakeholders are increasingly anxious to understand more about what these investments have actually achieved.  After all, a focus on results is a key component of MCC’s core model, and the agency is known for pushing the envelope in this area.  MCC’s rigorous ex-post evaluations will be the critical piece that tells the story about development impact, but the results of these studies aren’t usually available

MCC’s Board Discusses Climate Change: Here’s Why it Matters

MCC has long applied rigorous environmental safeguards and standards to its investments in partner countries.  And since President Obama’s September 2014 Executive Order on Climate-Resilient International Development, MCC (along with other key USG foreign assistance agencies) has been expanding  its efforts to ensure that it considers climate change risk—and, where possible, mechanisms for adaptation—in investment planning and execution

Pages

Tags

Experts

By Date