Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

For Educators

Here you will find CGD work of special interest to development studies educators and their students including syllabuses from courses taught by CGD-affiliated professors as well as slidedecks and multimedia presentations. We have selected from CGD’s hundreds of publications those that provide broad overviews or are otherwise more readily accessible than CGD’s more technical work. Search the materials by topic using the toolbar below and consult our list of development programs at different universities around the world.

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Visit CGD! As the CGD event schedule permits we welcome faculty-led student groups to our offices in Washington for one-hour introductory briefings and Q&A. Faculty interested in arranging such of visit are invited to contact Kristina Wilson.

Book Purchase and Review Copies: CGD books are available for purchase online through our website or, for bulk orders, through the Hopkins Fulfillment Service, P.O. Box 50370, Baltimore MD 21211-4370. Tel: 1-800-537-5487. For complimentary review or exam copies, please send a note to publications@cgdev.org with details about the potential review or the course you are teaching.

US-India Intellectual Property Rift - Arvind Subramanian and Kimberly Elliott

With the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) reported to be considering a downgrade of India, trade ties between the two countries are even rockier than usual. Worse, the decision could be announced soon after a newly elected Indian government takes office in May, potentially starting a new relationship on a very sour note.  Arvind Subramanian, a senior fellow at CGD and the Peterson Institute, recently warned about these risks in a piece in India’s Business Standard

Assessing Performance-Based Payments for Forest Conservation: Six Successes, Four Worries, and Six Possibilities to Explore of the Guyana-Norway Agreement

4/7/14

In 2009, Guyana created a Low Carbon Development Strategy to develop economically while keeping its entire forest intact, and signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Norway to receive performance-based payments in the tens of millions of dollars annually contingent upon holding nationwide deforestation to a near-zero rate. In mid-February, 2014, we visited Guyana as part of a three-country study to attempt to gain insights of value to the future expansion of performance-based payments in other countries and other sectors. 

Balancing Energy Access and Environmental Goals in Development Finance: The Case of the OPIC Carbon Cap

4/3/14
Todd Moss, Roger Pielke, Jr., and Morgan Bazilian

The international community has ambitious goals for responding to climate change and increasing global access to energy services. To date, these agendas have been viewed to be largely complementary. However, policy makers are now facing more explicit interactions between environment, energy, and economic and social development objectives and associated trade-offs.

Hating on the Hurdle: Reforming the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s Approach to Corruption

3/10/14

The Millennium Challenge Corporation is a US agency that provides results-oriented assistance to low- and lower-middle income countries that exhibit strong performance on a number of measures of development. Among these measures is the Worldwide Governance Indicator for control of corruption. A country must score in the top half of its income group on control of corruption to pass the overall selection procedure. This paper examines the empirical underpinning of this “corruption hard hurdle.”

From Maize to Haze: Agricultural Shocks and the Growth of the Mexican Drug Sector - Working Paper 355

2/24/14
Oeindrila Dube, Omar Garcia-Ponce, and Kevin Thom

We examine how commodity price shocks experienced by rural producers affect the drug trade in Mexico. Our analysis exploits exogenous movements in the Mexican maize price stemming from weather conditions in U.S. maize-growing regions, as well as export flows of other major maize producers. Using data on over 2,200 municipios spanning 1990-2010, we show that lower prices differentially increased the cultivation of both marijuana and opium poppies in municipios more climatically suited to growing maize.

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