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Shared Harvest

What if development cooperation didn't have to mean charity? CGD's Michael Clemens saw a way to help Haiti recover from the 2010 earthquake and benefit the US economy at the same time. Learn more.

Shared Border, Shared Future: A Blueprint to Regulate US-Mexico Labor Mobility

Mexico and the United States have lacked a bilateral agreement to regulate cross-border labor mobility since 1965. Since that time, unlawful migration from Mexico to the U.S. has exploded. Almost half of the 11.7 million Mexican-born individuals living in the U.S. do not have legal authorization. This vast black market in labor has harmed both countries. These two neighboring countries, with an indisputably shared destiny, can come together to work out a better way.

The Asian Development Bank at 50: Adapting for a New Era in Development Finance

With the 50th anniversary of ADB as a backdrop, this event will examine how the bank is adapting to the dramatic changes in Asia, and what its role in the region should be in the years ahead. Does ADB financing still matter in a region that is seemingly awash in capital? How do the bank's leading shareholders like the United States and Japan see the institution's role going forward? Are new institutions like the AIIB partners or rivals, and how are they causing the ADB to adapt?

The 4 "P"s that Get Stuff Done – ONE's Jamie Drummond

Almost a year since the adoption of the SDGs in a celebrity-endorsed fanfare, ONE cofounder Jamie Drummond and CGD's Rajesh Mirchandani discuss how the practice of advocacy has changed through time, and what organizations like ONE and CGD can learn from each other.

OPIC Commitments by Country Income Group, Percent of Total

When we took a deep dive into OPIC’s portfolio earlier this year, we found that the share of commitments going to high-income countries had increased significantly.  At the same time, the share of OPIC commitments in poorer countries had been declining over the previous 15 years. However, in 2015, there was a clear uptick in the percentage of OPIC commitments going towards lower middle-income countries.

Cat Bond Issuance Since 1996: Still Mainly for Rich Country Risks

“Cat” bonds are effectively a cheaper source of large-scale insurance coverage against clearly measured risks like earthquakes, storms, or even disease outbreaks. Generally, though, coverage hasn’t trickled down to the poorer and most at-risk countries—precisely those which are most vulnerable when aid fails to arrive or arrives piecemeal. Less than a twentieth of the total value of these products issued since 1996 covers risks in countries that the World Bank classifies as upper middle-income or below (places where income per capita is $12,475 or lower). They have mainly covered risks in the US and other high income countries (HICs).

Estimated Election Costs with Biometrics

Estimated Election Costs With Biometrics

While biometric technology can be costly—usually from $15 million to $100 million per election—its price tag seems relatively minor compared to the potential costs of post-election violence. This can run into the billions of dollars as economic growth stalls, in addition to less readily quantifiable human losses. If biometrics can make even a modest contribution to delivering more credible elections—and thus reducing the likelihood of violence—their use could be a worthwhile bet.

Damages Mainly in Rich Countries vs. Deaths in Poor Ones - 1980-2010

Damages Mainly in Rich Countries vs. Deaths in Poor Ones, 1980-2010

From a financial perspective, disasters appear to have been kind to developing countries. That makes sense: highways in Tokyo, for example, cost more than roads in Sri Lanka. But the costs in terms of human lives are dramatically higher in developing countries. That makes humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters highly regressive—their toll falls disproportionately on the poorest and most vulnerable. 

The Humanitarian Financing Deficit is Growing Quickly

This chart compares agencies’ requests for funding through humanitarian-response plans. Underinvestment in resilience and increasing costs due to late response show up as a rising deficit, as calls on donors’ humanitarian budgets go unmet. Since response plans are filed after crises develop, funding is late almost by design. And it arrives in the straitjacket of annual disbursements, despite the multi-year nature of many crises 

Emergency Aid is Broken: Using Insurance to Make Disasters Dull

Millions of people live with the risk of rapid-onset disasters like cyclones, slow-onset disasters like drought, or the threat of conflict. We often wait for these crises to develop to collect money from donors, a delay that costs lives and dramatically raises the costs of responding. As a result, there was an $8 billion gap between what frontline agencies requested to tackle crises last year and what they received. 

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