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Tag: Global Health

 

Back to the People: Reorienting China’s Health System to Primary Care

For decades, primary health care in China has been practically forgotten. Most people in China today seek care directly at hospitals rather than local village clinics. With hospitals overwhelmed by patients for even minor conditions, doctors provide low quality care. But a new Health Economics study provides hope that it is possible to shift utilization from hospitals back down to village clinics – and back to the people.

The Known Unknown: Estimating the Global Burden of Disease

Global burden of disease (GBD) estimates help us understand how disease, injury and risk factors impact health at both the population and individual levels. Specifically, the GBD measures the prevalence and impact of fatal and non-fatal conditions at the country (and sometimes sub-national) level, as well as the underlying causes for these conditions.

Millions Saved 3: (New!) Case Studies in Global Health

Cement is poured, and children in Mexico have less diarrhea. Acetic acid is applied, and cervical cancer claims the lives of fewer women in India. Poor households receive regular cash transfers in South Africa, and girls reduce sexual activity. These are a few cases in which large-scale efforts to improve health in low and middle-income countries have succeeded, and are among a new generation of success stories that CGD and the Disease Control Priorities Network (DCPN) will feature in the third edition of Millions Saved, set for release in 2015.

What’s New in Tobacco Control?

Saturday was World No Tobacco Day which prompted me to ask: “What’s new?” After looking at the press releases, I decided that the most significant thing that happened last year was that another 30 million young people have started smoking around the world. Of these, 25 million are in low- and middle-income countries and about 12 million of them will die prematurely from disease linked to tobacco – 10% of them because of second-hand smoke. This epidemic is not caused by a virus or spread by mosquitoes. It is intentionally planned and profited from by large tobacco companies – for-profit multinationals as well as state-owned monopolies.

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