Ideas to Action:

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Tag: Global Health

 

Using “Value of Information” Concepts to Prioritize the Data Revolution

I recently proposed that any assessment of a country’s statistical capacity be structured around the functions of government, such as those offered by the UN statistical office here.  When this list is fully expanded, it includes all of the data that advanced countries like the US or Japan use to manage government and inform citizens.  Most developing countries will fall below such an ambitious standard.  So how should investments in improved statistical capacity be prioritized?

Global Health "Best Buys": The Key Is in Delivery

Successful investments in global health—or “best buys”— can be defined in many ways: a cost-effective commodity or technology, a well-trained health workforce, an evidence-informed policy, etc. We recently hosted an event in partnership with PSI, PATH, Devex, and Merck to discuss this topic, and noted a reoccurring theme:  service delivery is key.

Donors and a Data Revolution

The High Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda calls for a “data revolution,” a new international initiative to improve the quality and scope of statistics and information available to citizens and policymakers. 

Dealing with Big Tobacco Bullies Part 2: The Trade and Investment Angle

Colleagues Amanda Glassman and Bill Savedoff posted an excellent piece on the role of the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, and other nontrade agencies in helping developing countries fend off the “Big Tobacco Bullies.” They argue that agencies like the World Bank could use their money, technical assistance, and policy dialogue to provide big visible support for developing countries to implement their anti-tobacco policies.

Top 10 Posts of 2013 on the Global Health Policy Blog

Value for money was at the top of our agenda this year, so I was pleased to see the topic also top the list of CGD’s most popular Global Health Policy blogs in 2013.  The rest of this year’s list is a mixed bag, reflecting a number of debates that will likely stick around in 2014 (data for development, universal health coverage, and the state of global health financing, to name a few). 

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