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Gates and VerveerUnlike World Water Day (March 22nd) or World TB Day (March 24th), International Women’s Day (March 8th) was a hard holiday to miss.  Or at least it was in Washington.  Hundreds of articles, conferences and galas focused on the inspiring women—and men—working to promote and celebrate the social, economic and political achievements of women.  But now that I’ve almost recovered from the whirlwind of woman-centeredness, I’m left wondering what’s next.

If we all know how important women are to achieving global development goals and strengthening communities, how can we make sure they stay central to the development dialogue on days other than March 8?  That’s what we’re trying to do here at CGD, and it’s also what our friends at ONE.org hope to do with their newest campaign, Women ONE2ONE.

Women ONE2ONE focuses advocacy efforts in five areas: providing basic maternal and child health care, expanding girls’ access to quality education, increasing access to prevention, treatment and care for HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria, investing in agricultural development (through the provision of tools and training) and expanding trade and access to capital.

CGD’s most recent work on adolescent girls, Start With A Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health, similarly highlights the importance of improving girls’ access to healthcare, focusing HIV prevention and maternal mortality investments on adolescent girls, and making girls’ secondary education a priority.  But in order to convince policymakers and donors to invest in these areas, we need proof of successful programs and interventions.

Two of Start With A Girl’s leading champions, U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer and Co-Chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Melinda Gates, are partnering with ONE.org to host an interactive conference call to discuss just that.  Next Monday, March 29, they will share stories of successful and innovative programs that are empowering women to end poverty and disease.  Anyone can join the call—so RSVP now to learn more about what’s working, and to help make sure women are at the center of development discussions every day.

Disclaimer

CGD blog posts reflect the views of the authors drawing on prior research and experience in their areas of expertise. CGD does not take institutional positions.