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Norway—Commitment to Development Index

The Commitment to Development Index ranks 27 of the world’s richest countries on policies that affect people living in poorer nations. This is the country report for Norway. For results of all countries, visit the main CDI page.

Overall

Norway ranks 9th on the Commitment to Development Index, with its strongest performance on aid, technology, migration, and finance.
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Aid

As in previous years, Norway ranks in the top 5 on the aid component. Norway is the most generous donor of all the CDI countries, providing 1.1% of its GNI to development assistance, which is significantly above the international commitment of 0.7% GNI. It is also the biggest contribution Norway has ever made. The quality of Norway’s foreign aid is only average, however, on most of the indicators forming the Quality of Official Development Assistance (QuODA) subcomponent. Norway could improve its score by providing forward spending information to the recipients of its aid and by promoting development in countries where it has a revealed comparative advantage.
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Finance

Norway has some of the most development-friendly policies regulating the finance sector and international investment. Norway has a top score on its institutional investment commitments, partly due to its membership in and contributions to such institutional frameworks as the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and the Extractives Global Programmatic Support (EGPS) Multi-Donor Trust Fund. There is room for improvement in Norway’s international investment agreements by its taking more into account the public policy goals of its investment partners and by including a more sustainable development approach. On the finance subcomponent, Norway receives a score above average. It could still improve its corporate transparency regulations.
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Technology

Norway is highly committed to fair technology policies and to spreading knowledge to developing countries, resulting in its showing the second best performance in this year’s CDI. It provides relatively high governmental support for research and development and adequate incentives for business R&D; in 2016, the Norwegian government provided 1.03% of GDP for research and development (weighted). This equals the second largest contribution of all the CDI countries, behind South Korea. Norway also plays a leading role in the diffusion of technology to developing countries through the design of its intellectual property rights. Its current 5th place ranking reflects its development-friendly approach to software patents and anti-circumvention rules, among others. Norway could do more, however, to facilitate knowledge sharing, especially by putting in place rights loss provisions that are more appropriate to the level of economic development of partnering ODA countries.
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Environment

As in previous years, Norway can be found in the lower half of the ranking on the environment component. It could improve its score by increasing gasoline taxes and lowering its greenhouse gas emissions per GDP (in terms of annual change) further. Norway is an important fossil fuel producer, which also partly explains its low score on the environment component. Norway is rewarded for its commitment to the Paris agreement and the UN fisheries agreement. It also reports low greenhouse gas emissions (in terms of absolute emissions).
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Trade

Norway performs poorly on the trade component, on which it can be found at the bottom of the ranking. Its best performance is on the impediments to import indicator, where its ranking is average. Norway reports the highest hurdles to trade in services of all the CDI countries and could facilitate trade in services by imposing fewer restrictions on service providers from other countries across all sectors. Its tariffs and quotas for products from developing countries are among the highest, after South Korea and Japan. Furthermore, Norway provides the highest share of agricultural subsidies to its farmers, thereby hurting production in developing countries.
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Security

Norway ranks average on this year’s CDI security component. Despite being party to all international security agreements taken into account in the CDI, Norway’s contributions to international peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions and international sea lanes protection are below average. It is rewarded for having only very limited arms exports to poor and undemocratic countries.
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Migration

Norway has good and development-friendly migration policies, resulting in its 5th place ranking in this year’s CDI. It has the best performance on the international commitment indicator. Alongside Italy and Portugal, Norway is the only CDI country to have ratified all three evaluated treaties. Another reason for Norway’s good performance is its open and sound integration policies. Norway can improve its performance on migration, however, by accepting a higher share of students from developing countries and by accepting more asylum seekers.
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