Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

Where is the U.S. Leadership on Trade?

While there is no particular reason that U.S. negotiators should make the first move to revive the Doha Round trade negotiations--Washington’s sins are not the greatest nor its offer the weakest--the U.S. should nonetheless lead and put the spotlight back where it belongs--on the E.U. and India. Given the ease with which the U.S. could improve its offer, it is nearly incomprehensible that the Americans chose instead to let the talks collapse in Geneva this past weekend.

Another imminent recovery in Zimbabwe or more Mugabe lies?

Zimbabwe's bankrupt regime has been consistent about one thing: the repeated claim that a big recovery is right around the corner. Of course, instead the economy just continues to implode, and now Zimbabweans are back to an average income not seen since the 1940s. President Robert Mugabe has just given an interview where he stuck to the same old script:

The Archbishop of Cape Town and Sen. Barack Obama on Faith and Development

Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane of South AfricaThe importance of involving communities and civil society organizations in development features prominently in the discourse of international agencies. Community involvement is vital, we hear, to reforming dysfunctional education systems, fighting disease, and overcoming corruption. But we hear much more about communities than from them.

19-Nation Poll Finds Overwhelming Support for Government Action on Climate Change

A 19-nation poll conducted for the BBC and released on the eve of the G-8 Summit in St. Petersburg finds huge majorities worried about climate change and other negative impacts of the ways that energy is produced and used, and supportive of government actions to address these risks. In countries as different as the U.S., Russia, Kenya and Brazil, majorities express concern that current energy policies pose the triple threats of harming the Earth’s climate, destabilizing the global economy, and sparking conflict and wars.

Notes from the Aspen Ideas Festival

I had the good luck to again attend this year's Aspen Ideas Festival last week -- the second annual gathering of what I predict will become a healthy competitor to Davos. As at Davos, most participants pay (though much less and they need not be CEOs), and some are put to work on panels and presentations. The objective is to foment and celebrate ideas - an important difference from Davos, where networking seems to be at a premium.

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