Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

An airplane flying

Getting the Most out of Your Organization’s Carbon Offsets

In October 2018, the UN-convened Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change delivered a high confidence estimate that the world has 12 years to achieve net CO2 emission reductions to limit global warming to 1.5° C. Shortly thereafter, Oxfam put out a blog post calling out the international development and aid sector for not thinking critically enough about our own carbon footprint, knowing that the most devastating effects of climate change will be felt by vulnerable populations in low-income countries. At the very least, the post suggested, purchasing carbon offsets would be a first step towards change.

Robotic arms in a factory. Adobe Stock.

Dissecting Different Views on the “Technology Revolution” and the Future of Work in Developing Countries

Caroline Atkinson and I recently posted a blog summarizing our main takeaways from a year-long study group that CGD hosted on technology, comparative advantage, and development prospects. A notable reaction I got to this piece is why there seemed to be such a wide divergence of views about this issue—notably relating to automation, robotics, and AI—across a range of experts. 

Photo of the development leaders conference in Beijing

Fostering Development Cooperation: A Development Leaders Conference

How can the development community truly harness the power of this cooperation and come together to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals? Last month, the Center for Global Development again hosted the Development Leaders Conference, this time in Beijing in partnership with the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB).

A Peruvian woman smiles in her kitchen, wearing dish washing gloves

The Debate about Headship in Poverty and Gender Studies

Disagreement exists over the usefulness of the concept of headship in household surveys, and of the use of female headship in the analysis of poverty. Some researchers even argue for getting rid of the headship concept altogether and for organizing the household roster instead around a chosen “primary respondent,” whatever her status in the household.

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