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Views from the Center

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Ghana Graduating to Middle-Income, Catching Up to Its Own Vibrant Civil Society

I had the pleasure of visiting Ghana again this month to discuss the possible implications for the country of its new middle income status, the result of rapid growth and (a rather significant 63%!) statistical adjustment.  In particular, I was there to talk about Ghana’s looming graduation from the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) window.   This is crucial for Ghana, since IDA i

What Does It Mean to Be Low Income?

Andy Sumner and I recently wrote about the fact that the number of low income countries in the world is rapidly shrinking –which is great news because it suggests poor countries are getting richer.  But how much does graduating to ‘middle income’ mean?  Here’s how the original income classification came about, according to the World Bank’s website:

The World Bank as a Foundation? Why I’m Scratching My Head Over the World Bank’s New Vision

Rapid changes in the world, especially the remarkable growth of so many once-poor countries and the revolutions sweeping across North Africa and the Middle East, will have tremendous consequences for institutions like the World Bank.  The Bank-Fund Spring Meetings start next week and it’s a chance for shareholders and Bank management to check-in and throw issues on the table.  Among the many big trends and questions about the future of the Bank, here are a few on my mind:

With Success, IDA Must Begin to Reinvent Itself

Fast forward to the year 2025.  IDA will begin negotiating its 21st Replenishment Agreement.  As with every other replenishment since 1960, donor countries will sit around a table and haggle over what sectors to promote, how to measure IDA’s impact, and how to allocate its resources.  And, they will be fiercely negotiating how much money to put in IDA’s

Development Policy of the Future… And Why We Aren’t Ready

This post originally appeared on devpolicy.org and devex and is based loosely on a February 10th talk at the Development Policy Center at Australian National University’s Crawford School and a March 1st speech at The International Development Research Centre in Ottawa..

The maxim that armies are always fighting the last war might just as aptly apply to development agencies: they are too often tackling yesterday’s problems with an outdated set of tools. If our development policies and agencies are to serve our interests, then we need them to both live in the present and prepare for the future. So, what then might development policy look like, say, a decade from now? What should we be thinking about now to get ready? Here are three big trends I think will be shaping the development future: