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The IMF beyond Istanbul

This post originally appeared in the Business Standard.

Wanted: An Asian Managing Director and new approaches to capital flows.

The IMF will strike a triumphalist tone at its forthcoming annual meetings in Istanbul. Some of this will be warranted because the IMF’s record in responding to the global financial crisis was commendable, even if its record leading up to it was less stellar (see http://www.iie.com/realtime/?p=942 for more details).

CGD Storms the Steel City

Ben Edwards in PittsburghAs part of an ongoing effort to persuade the leaders of the G-20 countries to better address the needs of poor countries in their Summit, CGD president Nancy Birdsall visited Pittsburgh yesterday with a small band of CGDers in tow, myself included.

Selling Some IMF Gold: A Good Idea Finally Happening

In 2002, John Williamson and I proposed that the gold at the IMF be used to deal with global public good (bad) of unsustainable debt of poor countries – and in particular to allow the IMF to finance suspension of debt service to the IMF and the multilateral development banks following an external shock.

A Good Start, but the G-20 Must Do More on Trade Preferences for Poor Countries

This is a joint posting with Kimberly Elliott and also appeared on the Huffington Post.

With one important reservation, we welcome last week’s EU proposal that the upcoming Pittsburgh G-20 Summit “should adopt the “Everything But Arms” (EBA) initiative without delay to support people in developing countries suffering from the crisis.” The EBA nominally provides 100 percent duty-free, quota-free market access for exports from least-developed countries, so suggesting that the rest of the G-20 replicate it is clearly in line with a Sept. 2 letter sent by members of the CGD Global Trade Preference Reform Working Group. The letter called upon:

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