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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

What Would Barack Obama Be Like If He Was Still President in 2051? Ask Gabon

What would Barack Obama be like if he was still president in 2051? We would expect that despite whatever initial good intentions, that four decades in power would inevitably give way to entrenched corruption, mindless sycophancy, and probably destroy our democracy. Such an outcome is not only barred by the U.S. constitution, but sounds like an absurd question today.

The Media Blitz of Dambisa Moyo's Dead Aid is Far from Dead

I had the privilege of speaking at Dambisa Moyo’s first Washington DC event, held recently at the Cato Institute (watch the webcast here). Her book Dead Aid is a full-frontal attack on aid to Africa (and has attracted an extraordinary amount of media attention). As much of my own work has been highly critical of the aid business, it was somewhat unusual (and a little awkward) to find myself mostly defending foreign aid.

Albert Einstein, Zimbabwe's Well-Suited Snakes, and New Depths of Futility!

Yes, yes, there is finally agreement on Morgan Tsvangirai joining the national unity government in Zimbabwe. But before anyone gets their hopes up too far, let's remember what Robert Mugabe did immediately after signing the power-sharing deal last September: grabbed all the meaningful cabinet posts, blocked Tsvangirai from travelling, and launched a new campaign of violence and kidnapping against human rights activists.

Advice to Obama's Africa Team: Don't Change Too Much

The following commentary originally appeared on the impressive new global news site, GlobalPost

The world has colossal expectations for incoming President Barack Obama and for changes in U.S. foreign policy. However, the new administration’s approach to Africa will almost certainly be marked more by continuity than change. And that's good news for Africa -- and America.

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