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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

Republican Victory, the Tea Party and U.S. Development Policy

The big news out of the U.S. midterm elections is the Republican victory and control of the House of Representatives. Thirty nine of the sixty new House Republicans align themselves with the Tea Party. One of the few things the pundits agree on is that there is no clear Tea Party foreign policy agenda, much less a unified view about whether and how to engage developing countries.

Why Have Mobile Phones Succeeded Where Other Technologies Have Not?

A few weeks ago, I was sitting on a panel for a conference on Information and Communications Technology and Development.  The debate on my panel was a lively one, and came down to one issue:  Can information technology (by itself) lead to development?  Obviously there has been a lot of buzz about this topic -- Jeffrey Sachs has called the mobile phone the “single most transformative technology” for de

Scoop! Members of the G-20 Development Working Group

Following my recent post on the G-20 development agenda and the upcoming Seoul Summit, several readers wrote asking if I had a list of the members of the Development Working Group. I starting asking around and was pleased to be able to obtain one. Of course, it would have been more useful if it had been released sooner, along with contact information for the members.

23 Wasn’t a Prime Number

Score one for climate sanity: Yesterday California’s voters overwhelmingly rejected Prop 23, a measure designed to undermine the state’s ambitious clean energy program. They also elected a governor who has pledged to accelerate the state’s green transition. This news resonates far beyond California, as the US green mantle shifts from a gridlocked federal government to the states that have supported clean energy all along.

QuODA Moving Forward

We’ve been getting a lot of feedback on the Quality of ODA (QuODA) assessment.  This post from the Development Policy blog shows how donor agencies can use our web tools to compare themselves against their peers and identify strengths and weaknesses. We hope readers will continue to use QuODA to learn about what constitutes “quality” aid and will continue to give us feedback and suggestions. Please send your comments here.

Should Natural Disaster Victims Be Offered Safe Haven and Opportunity Abroad?

(Kaci Farrell contributed to this post and preparations for the roundtable)

Last week, I hosted a roundtable here at CGD to discuss how the United States and other rich countries might better provide safe haven and opportunity to potential migrants from developing countries that are in acute need—particularly the victims of natural disasters.

This question has been at the forefront of my mind since the earthquake ravaged Haiti on January 12.

Currency Wars Are a Development Problem and the G-20 Has a Major Role to Play in the Solution

Last weekend’s communiqué from the G-20 finance ministers is a first step to bridge the divide in the ongoing currency wars. I find both hope and disappointment in the Communiqué. It is very positive that the G-20 ministers have called for the IMF to help identify countries with policies leading to large and unsustainable imbalances. This is a step in the right direction, although no specific quantitative indicators have yet been advanced.

Development and the Seoul G-20 Summit

Reports of progress last weekend notwithstanding, the so-called currency wars—the reality and threat of competitive devaluations—are likely to continue to dominate the news about the upcoming Seoul G-20 Summit.

The G-20 Is a Great Idea … but Let’s Make Sure the Execution Is Right!

This post is joint with Enrique Rueda-Sabater

Moving from the clearly obsolete G-7 to a broader group that reflects the reality of today’s world makes eminent sense. Doing it on the basis of a grouping improvised during the crisis-before-last (and making sure that it included the then-favorite finance ministers of the U.S. and Canadian sponsors) is squandering the opportunity to move up to a credible, transparent, global governance platform.

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