Ideas to Action:

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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

Migration-and-Development Is All Grown Up—and It’s Going to Get Even Bigger

Migration-and-development has grown into a field of its own, in both research and policy.

One picture reveals the trend in research. In the 1960s there was a burst of research interest in migration and development—mostly about migration within countries, as much of the developing world embarked on rapid urbanization. That interest waned in the 70s. But over the last 20 years, more and more development papers mention migration, and more and more migration papers mention development:

A New CGD Study Group—Beyond the Fence—for a Better Development Relationship at the US-Mexico Border

CGD studies the ways that the richest countries affect the rest of the world, far beyond foreign aid. And the US massively shapes economic development in its neighbors to the south. The 2,000 mile border between the United States and Mexico is an economic cliff, the largest GDP per capita differential found at any land border on earth. Across this fault line, the two nations continue a deep and centuries-old exchange of goods, services, investment, labor, culture, and ideas.

The Premier Research Conference on the Economics of Migration and Development: A Call for Papers

International labor mobility holds some of the biggest opportunities to extend economic opportunity to more people. A small group of economists and other social scientists is working to understand those opportunities better. They have coalesced around an annual but still-young research conference, the Migration and Development Conference—and I’m delighted to say that CGD is involved.

Two Cheers for the New Republican Proposal on "STEM" Immigration

Republicans in the US House of Representatives have proposed a step toward immigration reform. The bill would change who can receive an annual block of 55,000 US permanent resident visas. Currently those visas go to people from countries with relatively low rates of immigration to the US via a lottery system. The new bill would close that program and reallocate the visas toward people earning doctorates in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

This Beats Most Aid by Miles - And It’s a Migration Non-Profit

Yesterday I discovered a development organization so revolutionary, most people wouldn’t even call it a development organization. It’s a non-profit called the Independent Agricultural Worker Center (CITA).

CITA is a matchmaker between farms and seasonal agricultural workers. The farms are in the United States; almost all of the workers are in Mexico. CITA brings them together and unleashes the vast economic power of labor mobility for development.

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