Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

How the United States Can Lead on Global Goods and Bads

Climate change is one of many global problems that pose risks to well-being for everybody in the world – and bigger, scarier, and harder to manage risks for poor people in poor countries.  As with non-state terrorism, pandemic diseases, cybercrime, war refugees and microbial resistance to antibiotics, no one country, rich or poor, wants to act alone in dealing with these “global public goods” (in this case bads) since other countries will free-ride on its efforts. Dealing with these development challenges requires America’s leadership.

A Letter from Nancy Birdsall

Dear friends, colleagues, supporters of CGD,

I am writing to share with you my decision, after a healthy period of careful consideration, to step down as president of CGD in 2016, once a successor is in place. I’m pleased and excited about moving to a new chapter in my work life, as a senior fellow at CGD, with more time for research, writing and collaborating with incredible colleagues; and a new chapter in the other part of life, with more time and flexibility to travel and enjoy a large and still-growing extended family.

Welcome Mayra Buvinic, and a New Focus on the Economics of Improving Women’s Lives

I’m pleased to announce that we are launching a new research program focused on the economics of improving women’s lives and well-being. Our aim is to bring the best economics research to identify specific actions that can advance gender equality, from fostering women’s involvement in business and entrepreneurship to making use of international policy levers and foreign donor investments. And I’m particularly pleased to welcome Mayra Buvinic as a new Senior Fellow with decades of experience in the fields of gender equality and women’s empowerment. 

The Political Paradox of Cash Transfers

Rigorous evaluations show giving poor people cash is a very effective policy. But polls show poor Tanzanians would rather have government services.

This is part II in our blog series about poll results from Tanzania on managing the country’s newfound natural gas wealth. Read part I on fuel subsidies and stay tuned for part III on transparency.

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