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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

Got a Favorite CGD Research Output in 2008? Tell Eldis!

Eldis, the online aggregator of development policy, practice and research at the Institute of Development Studies in Sussex, is conducting a survey to identify "the most significant new piece of development research of 2008." This strikes me as having roughly the same statistical validity as American Idol does for when it comes to finding new singing talent. Still, as with Idol and other talent shows, the entertainment value of a popularity contest is hard to dispute!

Whither the IMF in the Current Crisis? Invite the Big Emerging Economies to the Table

IMF and Participants at the upcoming meetings of the IMF and World Bank in early October are bound to promise with considerable conviction an increase and an improvement in international coordination of domestic financial regulators -- just as U.S. Treasury and Fed officials are now promising, with considerable conviction, to revisit and reform the rules and the coordination of a currently fragmented regulatory set-up within the U.S.

Poor in Developing Countries are Victims of Our Mistakes (Development Impacts of Financial Crisis)

I suspect that the fallout from this crisis will remind us all that rich world growth and macro policy still matter for developing countries and for the poor within them, even though some of these economies are very large and have been growing very rapidly. The growing interconnectedness of the world -- globalization -- means that they are victims of our mistakes just as we are increasingly vulnerable to theirs.

U.S. Financial Crisis Will Mean Slower Growth, Rising Inequality in Developing World (Development Impacts of Financial Crisis)

For many developing countries, the U.S. credit crisis will mean slower growth and rising inequality. The effects will be protracted, and not all will show up at the same time. And the nature and degree of impact will vary widely. Some countries, notably those with extensive foreign exchange reserves and strong fiscal positions, will be much better able to cope than others. But overall the crisis is very bad news for developing countries and especially for the poor.