Ideas to Action:

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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

Will the World Bank Still Be Center Stage When It Turns 75?

What does it mean when a majority of the World Bank’s shareholders (measured by voting shares) decides to put capital in a new multilateral development bank (MDB) and not the World Bank itself? The flood of countries joining the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is unavoidably a soul-searching moment for the Washington-based institution long known simply as “the bank” in the development community. 

Carrots for Ukraine, Sticks for Russia: What the International Financial Institutions Can Do in Response to Crimea

The IMF, World Bank, EBRD, and the European Investment Bank have all emerged as significant players in the dramatic events in Ukraine in recent weeks. The Obama administration has very visibly sought to educate Congress on the central role of the IMF in helping to shore up the country’s shaky economy. And the three development banks have figured prominently in press releases coming from the European Union and the United States as a demonstration of the international community’s support for Ukraine’s interim government.

Strengthening Capital Markets in Emerging Economies: Two Key Issues that the G20 Should Not Miss

The agenda for the G-20 finance ministers and central bank governors meeting in Sydney this weekend focuses on two themes: promoting stronger economic growth and employment and making the global economy more resilient. The G-20 leaders have recognized that expanding and strengthening capital markets in developing countries is crucial to both these goals and member countries have identified this as a priority issue for their deliberations.

A Missed Opportunity for Sensible US Action on IMF—And Why It Matters

This week Senate appropriators failed to include an OK for an International Monetary Fund quota increase in the Senate version of the continuing resolution—the spending bill to keep open the US government for the remaining six months of the fiscal year 2013. The administration had requested Senate appropriators approve a transfer of previous US commitments from one IMF account to another -- a transfer involving virtually no cost for US taxpayers.

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