Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD in the News

December 12, 2018

The AI boom is happening all over the world, and it’s accelerating quickly (The Verge)

By Nick Statt

From the article:

A paper from US think tank, the Center for Global Development, that was published back in July centered on the potential effects of AI and robotic automation on global labor markets. Researchers found that there is not nearly enough work being done to prepare for the overall automation fallout, and we’re spending too much time debating the general ethics and viability of complete automation in a narrow set of markets. “Questions like profitability, labor regulations, unionization, and corporate-social expectations will be at least as important as technical constraints in determining which jobs get automated,” the paper concluded.
 
Read the full article here.
 
December 12, 2018

Digital wallet concept can boost farming (Business Daily)

From the article:

More than 60 percent of farming in Africa is done manually and only less than 20 percent employ machinery and this is the key reason that the continent still lags in food security. Research shows that agricultural production has remained stagnant while at the same time the population has expanded with a fast-rising middle class.

As a result, Africa food imports are rising so much that according to the World Bank the demand will be up by 60 percent by 2030. The President of the African Development Bank, Dr Akinwumi Adesina, in a speech at the Centre for Global Development event held in Washington DC in April 2017, said “Africa’s annual food import bill of $35 billion, estimated to rise to $110 billion by 2025, weakens African economies, decimates its agriculture and exports jobs from the continent.”

 

December 10, 2018

Mobile savings helping women (The Citizen)

From the article:
 
The emergence of digital channels is seen as the best alternative for bridging the gender gap when it comes to accessing financial services, new research shows.
 
According to the Washington DC-based think tank, Centre for Global Development, their recent research in Tanzania and Indonesia indicated a large and unexplored demand for movile saving platforms, which play a great role, especially for women.
 
"Mobile savings reduce transaction cost, provide privacy and increase economic self-reliance for women who are good at saving," said a senior fellow with the Centre for Global Development, Ms. Mayra Buvinic, who conducted the research in Tanzania.
 
Read the full article here.
 
October 27, 2017

Why Do Nations Invest In International Aid? Ask Norway. And China (Washington Post)

From the article:

How much are acts of generosity worth in international relations? For affluent countries, foreign aid has helped spread power and influence. Donors give foreign aid in part because it will benefit them. For example, political scientist Carol Lancasterfinds that domestic politics and international pressures combine to shape how and why donor governments give aid, and that aid was initially based on “hard-headed, diplomatic realism.”

The Trump administration’s proposal to slash foreign aid by more than one-third (including drastic cuts to global health and humanitarian aid) represents a major shift away from the goal of using aid to attain “smart power,” a strategy that supplements the ability to exercise brute force with efforts to win hearts and minds in far-off places. At the other end of the spectrum is Norway, a small but wealthy country, which has consistently tried to bolster its “soft power” ever since it helped broker a peace agreement between Israel and Palestine in the 1990s. Between these two extremes is China, which is using foreign aid to acquire greater soft power as it gears up for a more active role in world affairs...

As it struggles to better integrate foreign aid and national interests, Norway has been falling in the Center for Global Development’s rankings of countries committed to development — one of the most cited indexes among aid advocates and civil society organizations. Such results directly undermine its carefully cultivated image of being a humanitarian superpower.

Read full article here.

September 6, 2017

Report: US Ranks Near Bottom in Commitment to Global Development (Foreign Policy)

From the article:

The United States ranks 23rd of 27 of the wealthiest countries in how its policies impact the rest of the world, according to the 2017 Commitment to Development Index. The index, prepared by the Center for Global Development, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, ranks countries based on their foreign aid, finance, technology, environment, trade, and security policy areas.

Scandinavian countries, which have traditionally places a high priority on development assistance, received top marks. Denmark took first place, followed by Sweden, Finland, and France. Germany surged 10 slots to 5th place from last year, primarily due to its open migration policy amid Europe’s refugee crisis. The United Kingdom took 7th place.

South Korea ranked last place, with Japan closely following in 26th place (despite their dismal rankings, however, both received top marks for technology policies).

Read full article here.

September 6, 2017

Nordic Countries Most Committed to Development, Says Think-Tank (Public Finance International)

From the article:

Center for Global Development’s Commitment to Development Index report, released this morning, ranked countries based on the impact of foreign aid and policies on trade, finance, migration, the environment and technology.

 “In our integrated world, decisions made by rich countries about their own policies and behaviour have repercussions for people in the developing nations,” author Ian Mitchell from Center for Global Development said in the report.

While Nordic countries ranked consistently high across the various components of the CDI, the US was ranked 23rd, down three places from last year, as a result of its low scores on finance, environment and aid, despite its high scores in trade and security. 

Denmark’s top overall ranking was a combination of its “generosity”, providing 0.75% of its national income, and the effectiveness of its aid, the report said.

Read full article here.

September 6, 2017

Trump or no Trump, US Ranks Near Bottom in Helping Poorer Nations (Thomson Reuters Foundation News)

From the article:

The United States placed near last among the world's wealthiest nations in an index ranking how their policies help improve the lives of people in poorer nations, a report showed on Wednesday.

The superpower ranked 23rd out of 27 countries in the yearly Commitment to Development Index but would have fared worse with data recent enough to capture U.S. President Donald Trump's policymaking, its authors said.

The Center for Global Development (CGD) compiled thousands of data points dating up to 2016, when Trump's predecessor Barack Obama was still in office.

The CGD said it looks at each nation's performance in areas of aid, trade, finance, migration, environment, technology and security to measure how policies of wealthy countries help or hurt the world's poorest people.

Denmark ranked at the top, in part due to effectiveness of its aid and its significant contribution to international peacekeeping efforts, the CGD said. It was followed by Sweden and Finland.

Read full article here.

September 6, 2017

Scandinavia Tops Rich Country Development Index, US Falls In Ranks (Devex)

From the article:

Denmark, Sweden and Finland have the strongest development policies out of the world’s 27 richest countries, according to the latest annual global development index.

The Center for Global Development’s 2017 Commitment to Development Index, released Wednesday morning, offers an indication of how high-income countries may reach global goals on environment, health and equality. It may then serve as a warning signal to the United States, Switzerland and Japan, which ranked 23rd, 24th and 26th, respectively, on the list, falling below Western and Central European countries, including the Czech Republic and Poland.

The development index measures how countries perform on aid, finance, technology, environment, trade, security and migration policy. South Korea falls at the bottom of the list. Even though it performed best for technology policy, it ranked worst for aid, environment and security policy.  

Read full article here.

September 6, 2017

US Ranks Very Low As A Wealthy Nation Improving 3rd World Lives (MSN News)

From the video:

In a ranking of nations that improve lives in the developing world, according to this year's Commitment to Development Index, Denmark ranks as the highest-performing wealthy country. Out of 27 countries, the US placed 23rd. Created by the Center for Global Development, the CDI ranks the 27 richest countries in terms of aid, finance, technology, environment, trade, security, and migration. The rankings are specifically in terms of how they help poorer countries.

Watch full video here.

September 6, 2017

Germany Climbs in Development Ranking by Taking in Refugees (Reuters)

From the article:

Germany has jumped 10 slots from last year to fifth place on a list ranking how well rich countries’ policies help improve lives in the developing world, mainly thanks to its willingness to take in refugees - a hot topic in its Sept. 24 election.

Denmark took over the top spot from Finland, which falls to third place, while Sweden moves up one notch to second on the list that includes the impact from foreign aid and policies on trade, finance, migration, the environment and technology.

“Germany moves up to fifth on the 2017 Index, mainly thanks to policies on migration, including accepting a large number of refugees,” author Ian Mitchell from the Washington-based Center for Global Development said in the report.

Labor mobility is potentially the most powerful tool for poverty reduction and income redistribution, he said.

Read full article here.

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