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Corruption and Development: Counting Results not Receipts

Join us to celebrate the launch of Charles Kenny's latest book, Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption. This work illustrates a growing problem: an important and justified focus on corruption as a barrier to development has led to policy change in aid agencies that is damaging the potential for aid to deliver results. Donors have treated corruption as an issue they can measure and improve, and from which they can insulate their projects at acceptable costs by controlling processes and monitoring receipts. Results Not Receipts highlights the weak link between donors’ preferred measures of corruption and development outcomes related to our limited ability to measure the problem. It discusses the costs of the standard anti-corruption tools of fiduciary controls and centralized delivery, and it suggests a different approach to tackling the problem of corruption in development: focus on outcomes.

RISE Conference 2017

RISE is a large scale, multi-country research programme developed to answer the question: “How can education systems be reformed to deliver better learning for all?” The objective of this year’s conference is to bring together high profile academics and policy makers to discuss the RISE research agenda. The conference features a range of invited and contributed talks and panels, as well as three sessions focused on our six Country Research Teams (CRTs), including the announcement of our two newest CRTs. The RISE Programme is a collaboration between the Center for Global Development in Washington DC, the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, and Oxford Policy Management in Oxford, UK, and our CRTs include Tanzania, India, Pakistan, and Vietnam, with two further countries to be announced shortly.

Public-Private Partnerships for Education in the Developing World: Learning Gains, Regulatory Failures, and Other Lessons from Policy Experiments

Public-private partnerships (PPPs) in education that combine public finance to provide free or subsidized access to privately delivered education are expanding in many developing countries, either to increase access where government capacity is limited or to improve learning outcomes—often with limited evidence on their success. This panel brings together experts from the policy and research spheres to review what we know about the design of effective partnerships, the hazards to be avoided, and the frontiers for new research.

Bilateral Economic Assistance, FY2016 to FY2018

Three Lessons for G7 Leaders on Refugees – IRC's David Miliband

The location for this year's G7 Summit, in the Sicilian coastal city of Taormina, is a reminder that Italy's shores are a frontline for refugees making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean from North Africa and the Middle East. For the summit dignitaries who will attend, IRC's David Miliband has some advice on how to address the refugee crisis, which he shares in this edition of the CGD Podcast.

Voices of Experience: A Conversation with Former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs

There is no more valuable time than now, in the early days of the new administration, for a bipartisan exchange among leaders of previous administrationson the formulation and execution of the international economic policies. Join CGD for a conversation with three former Treasury Under Secretaries for International Affairs who played central roles in the Bush II and Obama administrations. The panel discusses the outlook for the global economy, international structural changes and challenges that have emerged since their time in office, the critical issues that will confront the next Under Secretary for International Affairs, and the nature of the job and lessons learned. This event marks the launch of the US Development Policy Initiative’s Voices of Experience series, which will feature discussions with senior officials from past administrations of both parties who shaped international development, economic, and financial policy.

Are We Ready for the Next Pandemic?

Consider this statement: Science knows how to deal with a pandemic outbreak, but policy gets in the way. That was how we framed a recent event at CGD with key people who led the US government’s response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014. Drawing from that event, this podcast brings you some ideas of how to improve the global system of response and increase our preparedness for the next inevitable outbreak. Speakers include Jeremy Konyndyk, Amy Pope, David Smith, Rebecca Martin, and Amanda Glassman.

The Conservative Case for OPIC: Harnessing the Private Sector for Development

With cuts to foreign aid on the horizon, the United States, now more than ever, needs to sharpen its tools to operate in a constrained budget environment. Key to this approach is a strong development finance institution that can leverage private investment to achieve development outcomes, as well as create opportunity for American companies abroad—all at less than no cost to the US taxpayer. At this event, Congressman Ted Yoho of Florida addresses the vital role the Overseas Private Investment Corporation plays in US development policy, and discusses how he came to support its mission. An expert panel discusses the conservative rationale behind OPIC, why its critics are wrong, and what can be done to strengthen the institution and leave it better prepared to address future development challenges.

Preventing the Next Pandemic: Opportunities and Challenges

An infectious disease outbreak anywhere on earth poses a direct threat to Americans. On airplanes, trains, and ships—and via migratory birds or insects that cannot be constrained by borders—pathogens can easily travel around the world, reaching a network of major cities in as little as 36 hours. Keeping Americans safe from the pandemic threat will require U.S. action and leadership both at home and abroad. A diverse panel of experts discusses the scale and scope of pandemic risk; the economic and security rationale for investment in pandemic preparedness; and opportunities to strengthen America’s ability to prevent and respond to the next pandemic.

Young Professionals and the Future of Global Development

Today’s newest recruits will determine tomorrow’s development agenda—and in this highly interactive, first-of-its-kind event, CGD research assistants and communications staff invite other young professionals and students to consider the future of global development.

What will international development look like in 20 years? What challenges will command our attention as leaders in the field? And how will we respond to, or rebuild, the fraying political consensus around development cooperation?

How to Make Disasters Predictable

Last year more than 83 million people in low- and middle-income countries were affected by natural disasters. We may not know when or where the next disaster will strike, but we know it will. So why do we still treat disasters like surprises? A new CGD report urges a different approach: make disasters predictable, using the principles and practices of insurance. Hear from four members of the working group in this week's podcast. 

Estimated Change in Total ODA Funding Level FY2016-FY2018

Given the false economies and the apparent prioritization of diplomatic and political objectives—what is the underlying strategic rationale here? At CGD we have been combing through the data to see what narrative emerges—and, in particular, which parts of the budget would sustain the most pain. This map shows the impact relative to all Official Development Assistance receipts to the countries.

Percent Change in the FY2016-2018 Budget

Percent Change in the FY2016 Budget to FY2018 Budget

Given the false economies and the apparent prioritization of diplomatic and political objectives—what is the underlying strategic rationale here? At CGD we have been combing through the data to see what narrative emerges—and, in particular, which parts of the budget would sustain the most pain. This map shows country-level cuts proportionally relative to FY2016 funding.

Absolute Difference from the FY2016 Budget to FY2018 Budget

Absolute Difference from the FY2016 Budget to FY2018 Budget

Given the false economies and the apparent prioritization of diplomatic and political objectives—what is the underlying strategic rationale here? At CGD we have been combing through the data to see what narrative emerges—and, in particular, which parts of the budget would sustain the most pain. This map shows the country-level cuts in absolute terms.

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