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Administrator Mark Green Visits clinic in Darfur, Sudan

Mark Green's Legacy and Priorities for the Next USAID Administrator

The Trump administration’s “America First” doctrine has often colored US development policy in an unfavorable way, seeming to inform decisions to withdraw from international dialogues on collective action challenges, restrict migration, and adopt a short-term, transactional view of foreign assistance. These actions have reflected poorly on the United States’ role as a global leader and have considerable implications for development outcomes.

Stock photo of a pile of money getting larger. Adobe Stock

Mobilizing $400 Billion: Using the Visible Hand of Development Banks

Is the crisis a signal on how devastating the great problems confronting our future could be in a world that is not prepared for them, in particular to face challenges such as major inequalities, the climate emergency, and the loss of nature. The way in which our world produces and consumes, calls for a recovery that would also imply a structural transformation towards a more inclusive and sustainable economic model. DBs could be a great contributor to such a transformation.

A chart showing that commodity prices fell rapidly during the Ebola outbreak

An Epidemic and a Commodity Price Rout at the Same Time? It Happened in 2014

The COVID-19 health crisis has been paired with sharply lower global demand and a Saudi-Russian price war in the oil market that has reduced commodity prices by around a third. While this seems unprecedented, a concurrent economy-halting epidemic and commodity price rout has happened before, in Liberia, West Africa during the Ebola outbreak of 2014.

A figure showing that the patients with the most critical cases are a small percentage but their case takes most of the resources required.

Strengthening the Basics: Approaches to COVID-19 Care in Low-Resource Settings

This blog focuses on hospital treatment for COVID-19 patients in low-resource-settings, considering what we know about the spectrum of COVID-19 illness and what this tells us about where resources might best be focused in low-resource-settings. As elsewhere, decision makers, global and local, must prioritise resourcing and capacity development for the ward-level care and simple oxygen therapy that most hospitalised COVID-19 patients will need—not the high-end clinical care that may well be impossible to scale-up in time in countries with limited resources.  

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