CGD Policy Blogs

 

Millions Saved 3: (New!) Case Studies in Global Health

Cement is poured, and children in Mexico have less diarrhea. Acetic acid is applied, and cervical cancer claims the lives of fewer women in India. Poor households receive regular cash transfers in South Africa, and girls reduce sexual activity. These are a few cases in which large-scale efforts to improve health in low and middle-income countries have succeeded, and are among a new generation of success stories that CGD and the Disease Control Priorities Network (DCPN) will feature in the third edition of Millions Saved, set for release in 2015.

What Works in Malaria Control?

This is the first blog in a series of two. Read the second here. This is a joint post with Miriam Temin. Miriam is coordinating editor for the new edition of Millions Saved.

After a comprehensive literature review, expert consultations, public calls for proposals, and advisory group meetings, we’ve mostly decided on a short list of cases for the new edition of Millions Saved—a book of case studies that document global health successes at scale. Selected interventions range from helmet laws to universal health coverage programs—but one of the most well-known global health efforts of the last decade, malaria control, hasn’t made our list -- at least not yet (for more on what did make the list, check back here in the coming months). 

Call for Proposals—Millions Saved Cases

Over the last half-century, global health gains have increased at historic levels (you can see for yourself by using Hans Rosling’s entertaining and informative Gapminder tool). While parts of the gain can be attributed to economic growth, specific health efforts continue to generate significant health benefits.