CGD Policy Blogs

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The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria: Performance and Vision

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (GFATM) was established very quickly in 2001 in response to a widespread perception that a rapid scale-up in financing was critical in the fight against the three diseases. Since it began operations in January 2002, GFATM has made important progress. It has raised substantial funding and become the world’s largest donor for TB and malaria. 70% of the programs reaching the two-year renewal stage are showing solid results. Rwanda, for example, has put over 4,000 people on ARV treatment, more than double its program target, and GFATM programs in aggregate have financed ARV treatment for 130,000 people to date.

About Vaccines for Development

CGDImmunization is one of the safest ways to reduce disease and poverty in developing countries. But 3 million people die every year of vaccine-preventable diseases; and that will likely rise to 4.5 million when rotavirus and pneumococcus vaccines are available, if past experience is any guide. And progress towards vaccines suitable for HIV, malaria and tuberculosis is painfully slow.

Effective Economic Growth for People: The Role of the United States

Political stability and sound domestic economic policies are the main ingredients in making development possible, according to William R. Cline, joint fellow of the Center for Global Development and the Institute for International Economics. In a presentation to the Society for International Development on December 12, 2004 Cline suggested three areas the U.S. should focus on in order to increase global development and reduce poverty.

Trade

How much does the U.S. help?

Why did a U.N. official’s remark soon after the tsunami hit that rich countries are “stingy” stir such a furor in the U.S.? We are a thick-skinned people, inventors of “Crossfire” and the NFL, led by a president who takes pride in disregarding foreign opinion. Yet even though Jan Egeland, the U.N. point person for disaster relief, did not single out the U.S., his words hit a raw nerve.

U.S. aid, global poverty, and the earthquake/tsunami death toll

Even as the tragedy in Asia elicits an outpouring of charity from Americans, it has sparked controversy over whether America is in fact generous. President Bush, Secretary of State Colin Powell, and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) chief Andrew Natsios have all asserted that America is generous. What are the facts?

How to win the AIDS battle

Smart generals study history. The lessons of battles past pro­vide valuable clues about how to win in the future. In the war against AIDS in the developing world we need to study how major successes have been achieved in health programs and how to apply those lessons today.

President Bush’s Second Term and Development: Five Issues Worth Watching

What will George W. Bush’s second term mean for the U.S. role in development? Nancy Birdsall, president of the Center for Global Development, sees two related challenges facing U.S. development initiatives. First is updating and reforming U.S. aid institutions to better meet today’s foreign policy needs. Second is delivering on promises to increase U.S. assistance at a time of rising deficits.

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