Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Publications

 

August 26, 2010

Zeroing In: AIDS Donors and Africa’s Health Workforce

This report focuses on the workforce strengthening strategies of three of the major HIV/AIDS donors—the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund), and the World Bank’s Africa Multi-country HIV/AIDS Program (the MAP)—and identifies six tasks for donors, national governments, and country stakeholders to undertake to reverse the severe shortage of skilled, motivated, and productive health workers.

Nandini Oomman , David Wendt and Christina Droggitis
August 16, 2010

Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health (Brief)

Improving adolescent girls’ health and wellbeing is critical to achieving virtually all international development goals. Start with a Girl: A New Agenda for Global Health shows why doing so is a global must and identifies eight priorities for international action.

June 23, 2010

FDA’s Role in Improving the Development Pathway for Neglected Disease Therapies - Congressional Testimony

Visiting Fellow Tom Bollyky testified before the U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, the Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies on how the FDA can help develop programs for neglected diseases. Programs for neglected diseases, such as tuberculosis, malaria and other parasitic illnesses, lack a regulatory infrastructure to ensure programs work properly.

June 14, 2010

The Race Against Drug Resistance

In an increasingly interconnected world, drug resistance does not stop at a patient’s bedside—it threatens global health. The conclusions of the Center for Global Development’s Drug Resistance Working Group make clear the need for urgent action to address this growing crisis.

Rachel Nugent , Emma Back and Alexandra Beith
June 14, 2010

The Race Against Drug Resistance (brief)

The Center for Global Development’s Drug Resistance Working Group urges pharmaceutical companies, governments, donors, global health institutions, health providers, and patients to collectively and immediately tackle this global health threat by implementing four key recommendations.

June 1, 2010

Sustaining and Leveraging AIDS Treatment

In the final installation of a three-part series, Mead Over estimates the fiscal burden of international AIDS treatment programs, and suggests ways that donors, governments, and patients can sustain current treatments while preventing future cases.

May 24, 2010

Using Incentives to Prevent HIV Infections

This essay proposes ways to improve the effectiveness of HIV prevention by strengthening incentives for both measurement and achievement. It builds upon a companion essay that proposes an “AIDS Transition”—that is, a gradual reduction in the number of people infected with HIV even as those inflected live longer—as a reasonable objective of donor and government AIDS policy.

May 17, 2010

The Global AIDS Transition: A Feasible Objective for AIDS Policy

Recognizing the donors’ obligation to sustain financing for the millions of AIDS patient who would not be alive today without it, this essay proposes a dynamic paradigm for the struggle with the AIDS epidemic—“the AIDS transition” —and argues that to most rapidly achieve an AIDS transition new funding of AIDS treatment should be tightly linked to dramatically improved and transparently measured prevention of HIV infections.

April 13, 2010

Every Dollar Counts: How Global AIDS Donors Can Better Link Funding Decisions to Performance

Billions of dollars have been allocated to fight HIV/AIDS in poor countries over the past decade, yet less than half of those requiring treatment receive it, and for every two people put on treatment, five more become infected. Donors have to do more with available funds. Now is the time to link funding decisions to performance.

Nandini Oomman , David Wendt , Ernesto Zedillo and Christina Droggitis
April 6, 2010

HIV/AIDS Monitor: Are Funding Decisions Based on Performance?

This report examines the use of performance-based funding (PBF) among the big three funders of HIV/AIDS programs in developing countries: the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the World Bank’s Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program for Africa (the MAP).

Nandini Oomman , Steven Rosenzweig and Michael Bernstein