Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Publications

 

August 31, 2011

Incentive Proliferation? Making Sense of a New Wave of Development Programs

A new wave of development programs that explicitly use incentives to achieve their aims is under way.They are part of a trend, accelerating in recent years, to disburse development assistance against specific and measurable outputs or outcomes. With a proliferation of new ideas under names such as “payments for performance,” “output-based aid,” and “results based financing,” it is easy to lose sight of basic underlying similarities in these approaches and to miss some significant differences.

Cover of Achieving an AIDS Transition: Preventing Infections to Sustain Treatment
August 15, 2011

Achieving an AIDS Transition: Preventing Infections to Sustain Treatment

Five million people in poor countries are receiving AIDS treatment, but international AIDS policy is still in crisis. This book shows how to reach an “AIDS transition,” which would keep AIDS deaths down by sustaining treatment while pushing new infections even lower, so that the total number of people living with HIV/AIDS finally begins to decline.

August 11, 2011

Scholars Who Became Practitioners - Working Paper 263

Mexico’s Progresa/Oportunidades conditional cash transfers program (CCT) is constantly used as a model of a successful antipoverty program. This paper argues that the transformation of well-trained scholars into influential practitioners played a fundamental role in promoting a new conceptual approach to poverty reduction.

August 10, 2011

Multidimensional Indices of Achievements and Poverty: What Do We Gain and What Do We Lose? - Working Paper 262

Poverty and well-being are multidimensional. Nobody questions that deprivations and achievements go beyond income. There is, however, sharp disagreement on whether the various dimensions of poverty and well-being can be aggregated into a single, multidimensional index in a meaningful way. Is aggregating dimensions of poverty and well-being useful? Is it sensible? Here CGD non-resident fellow Nora Lustig summarizes and contrasts three key papers that respond to these questions in strikingly different ways.