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January 27, 2014

Rethinking the Financial Design of the World Bank - Working Paper 352

Since their inception, through 2012, the institutions comprising the World Bank group have been involved in lending nearly a trillion dollars. In this paper, we focus on the IBRD, which is the core of the World Bank. The IBRD has the potential to continue to grow and be an important player in official financial flows, supporting critical long-term development projects with large social returns, in sectors ranging from infrastructure, social sectors, or environment. 

Devesh Kapur and Arjun Raychaudhuri
April 29, 2013

China's Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection - Working Paper 323

China’s presence in Africa is, beyond dispute, large in both trade and what can be called official finance to Africa. But how large, exactly? A new database from the College of William and Mary brings additional resources to help answer the question. This paper describes the new database, its key findings, and its possible applications and limitations of the data, which is being made publicly available for the first time.

Austin Strange , Brad Parks , Michael J. Tierney , Andreas Fuchs , Axel Dreher and Vijaya Ramachandran
May 25, 2012

Development Impact Bonds Working Group Briefing Note

A Social Impact Bond (SIB) is a payment for outcomes model that seeks to shift attention, incentives and accountability to results; transfer risk and responsibility for performance to private investors and implementers; and drive value for money and efficiency gains throughout the cycle. A Development Impact Bond is a potential variation of the SIB model that would provide new sources of financing to achieve improved social outcomes in developing country contexts.

July 22, 2011

Constraints to Domestic Enterprise Financing in Post-Conflict Liberia - Working Paper 260

This paper examines the efficacy of loan programs in the development of domestic enterprises in the immediate aftermath of conflicts. The author explores whether the strategies employed by such programs are effective and if there are opportunities for improving the outcomes of similar projects in post-conflict environments.

John Gorlorwulu

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