Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

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November 18, 2021

The Journey to Universal Health Coverage

Since 2018, the government of Kenya has worked on a series of policies and pilots to support the implementation of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) by 2022. UHC ensures that all individuals and communities receive the health services they need without suffering financial hardship.

An image of the policy paper.
October 13, 2021

Convergence, Development, and Energy-Intensive Infrastructure: Getting Africa to High-Income Status

The structural changes in an economy that accompany its growth to high-income status have been predictable in Europe, the United States, and Asia, characterized by declining employment in agriculture and rising levels of urbanization driven by jobs in the modern industrial sector. As agricultural productivity rises, the share of people employed in agriculture declines, and both urbanization and employment in manufacturing increase.

Screenshot of the Note Cover
August 12, 2021

Malaria Case Management in the Private Sector in Africa: A Call for Action to Identify Sustainable Solutions

Over the past two decades, partnerships between bilateral and multilateral funders, philanthropy, national governments, and the private sector have substantially increased global access to effective malaria treatment. Nevertheless, further action on malaria case management is needed to meet global targets for reduced malaria morbidity and mortality.

An image of the policy paper.
July 28, 2021

Identifying Binding Constraints on Digital Payment Services in Ethiopia: An Application of a Decision Tree Framework

While several comparable countries in sub-Saharan Africa have seen a significant increase in financial inclusion, mainly driven by digital financial services, Ethiopia still performs poorly. Even digital payment and transfer services, which lower-income and less literate segments of the population could benefit from, are rarely used.

Getnet Alemu , Tadele Ferde and Alejandro Fiorito
The cover of the brief
July 19, 2021

Why Europe Should Build Legal Migration Pathways with Nigeria

The youth population within Nigeria is rapidly increasing, but despite their high levels of education and skills, many are struggling to find meaningful work opportunities at home. At the same time, Europe’s working-age population is declining, resulting in employers in these countries facing large and persistent skill shortages within a range of mid-skill professions. This brief focuses on the first part of this equation, the why: understanding the opportunity that lies before us to better link the labor markets of Nigeria and Europe and the innovation that could do just that.

Samik Adhikari , Michael Clemens , Helen Dempster and Nkechi Linda Ekeator
Cover of the report
July 19, 2021

Expanding Legal Migration Pathways from Nigeria to Europe: From Brain Drain to Brain Gain

This report, a joint production between the World Bank and the Center for Global Development (CGD), outlines how the Global Skill Partnership model could be used to meet needs on both sides. It explores the growing youth unemployment rate in Nigeria, the increasing emigration pressure, and the structures that have been set up to manage this movement. It also explores the large skill shortages persistent within Europe, its migration management relationship with Africa, and the potential positive impacts of opening new legal migration pathways. It creates a framework with which to explore potential sectors and partner countries for the implementation of the Global Skill Partnership model, providing practical steps that governments can follow.

Samik Adhikari , Michael Clemens , Helen Dempster and Nkechi Linda Ekeator
July 19, 2021

A Global Skill Partnership in Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) between Nigeria and Europe

This case study is one of three in a recent report by CGD and the World Bank, outlining how CGD’s Global Skill Partnership model could be applied to boost the number of skilled professionals in Nigeria and Europe. This piece focuses on the ICT sector. It explores the existing digital and migration ecosystems in Nigeria and four European countries—Germany, the United Kingdom, Belgium, and Lithuania—providing practical recommendations for how a targeted skilled migration pathway could be used to boost economic growth in both markets.

Samik Adhikari , Michael Clemens , Helen Dempster and Nkechi Linda Ekeator
July 19, 2021

A Global Skill Partnership in Nursing between Nigeria and the UK

This case study is one of three in a recent report by CGD and the World Bank, outlining how CGD’s Global Skill Partnership model could be applied to boost the number of skilled professionals in Nigeria and Europe. This piece focuses on the health care sector. It explores how the model could be used to foster ethical and sustainable health worker migration between Nigeria and the United Kingdom, improving training and health management infrastructure while increasing the stock of health workers in both countries.

Samik Adhikari , Michael Clemens , Helen Dempster and Nkechi Linda Ekeator
July 19, 2021

A Global Skill Partnership in Construction between Nigeria and Germany

This case study is one of three in a recent report by CGD and the World Bank, outlining how CGD’s Global Skill Partnership model could be applied to boost the number of skilled professionals in Nigeria and Europe. This piece focuses on the construction sector. It explores how the model could be used to increase the construction skills of potential migrants within Nigeria, with some moving to Germany to take advantage of recent legislative shifts there to foster more vocationally trained migration.

Samik Adhikari , Michael Clemens , Helen Dempster and Nkechi Linda Ekeator
July 1, 2021

The Indirect Health Effects of COVID-19: Emerging Findings from Kenya, the Philippines, South Africa, and Uganda

COVID-19 has caused significant morbidity and mortality, both directly and indirectly via the disruption to routine health services. Evidence on the indirect health impacts has largely been anecdotal or modeled, and cause/program-specific. We aimed to document the indirect health impacts in four countries with different experiences: Kenya, the Philippines, South Africa, and Uganda.

Diana Beatriz S. Bayani , Carleigh Krubiner , Edwine Barasa , Claire Biribawa , Alexander Broadbent , Lyle Casas , Kalipso Chalkidou , Y-Ling Chi , Herkulaas Combrink , Okethwangu Denis , Mary Kaakyo , Evelyn Kabia , Kadondi Kasera , Jacob Kazungu , Morris Ogero , Stacey Organi , Anton Paterno , Lydia Regan , Benjamin Smart , Piet Streicher , Justin Tan , Nazarius Tumwesigye , Valerie Gilbert Ulep , Jhanna Uy , Vanessa Siy Van and Damian Walker
The cover of the case study
June 15, 2021

From Displacement to Development: How Ethiopia Can Create Shared Growth by Facilitating Economic Inclusion for Refugees

This case study is part of the “Let Them Work” initiative by Refugees International (RI) and the Center for Global Development (CGD). It outlines the barriers refugees face in Ethiopia to economic inclusion; the impacts of these barriers; and the steps that the government of Ethiopia, international organizations, donors, and the private sector could take to overcome them

Cover of Working Paper 584
June 14, 2021

Can Africa Help Europe Avoid Its Looming Aging Crisis?

There will be 95 million fewer working-age people in Europe in 2050 than in 2015, under business as usual. The paper compares business as usual estimates of inflows to 2050 with the size of the labor gap in Europe. Under plausible estimates, business as usual will fill one-third of the labor gap. This suggests a need for an urgent shift if Europe is to avoid an aging crisis. Africa is the obvious source of immigrants, to mutual benefit.

A graphic of the indexed GIPC 2019 IP Index Component Score for African Countries and China.
May 18, 2021

China’s Model of Innovation: Are There Lessons for African Countries?

Innovation is known to be important for productivity and economic growth, while intellectual property rights are, in conventional economics models, thought to spur innovation. Yet China, which averaged over 6 percent annual economic growth for three decades and is often cited as a “growth miracle,” has been criticized for poor intellectual property rights protection domestically, as well as when exporting products abroad.

Peter Grinsted and Ovigwe Eguegu
Cover of working paper 581
May 12, 2021

Do High-Stakes Exams Promote Consistent Educational Standards?

Each year over two million secondary-school students across English-speaking West Africa sit coordinated exams, with the explicit goal of maintaining consistent educational standards across schools and over time. We find that scores across math items drawn from different exam years—when taken by an identical group of students on the same day—closely track fluctuations in Ghana’s national pass rates over time, absent any role for cheating or changes in real performance.

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