Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Publications

 

Cover of Policy Paper 148
July 2, 2019

Steps Toward Forest Landscape Restoration in The Context of The Rohingya Influx: Creating Opportunities to Advance Environmental, Humanitarian, and Development Progress in Bangladesh

There are now one million Rohingya refugees in Cox's Bazar, comprising about 30 percent of the population. This increase, coupled with immediate needs for fuelwood and shelter, has diminished livelihoods due to deforestation and loss of access to land; soil and slope erosion; fuelwood scarcity and associated risks to safety of people collecting fuelwood; increased encroachment and forest degradation; declining water quality, groundwater reserve depletion, and air pollution; decreasing soil quality; and climate vulnerability.

Cover of Creating Opportunities for Rohingya Refugees and Hosts Through Forest Landscape Restoration
July 2, 2019

Creating Opportunities for Rohingya Refugees and Hosts Through Forest Landscape Restoration

To contribute to a growing base of knowledge and expertise on opportunities to reverse the specific effects of forest loss and degradation—and to improve the conditions of host populations and refugees in Cox’s Bazar—BRAC, the Center for Global Development, and The Nature Conservancy convened workshops with global and national experts and stakeholders in September 2018 in Cox’s Bazar. 

A room full of internally displaced people in Myanmar, with three women up from
May 10, 2019

How Urban are IDPs and What Does that Mean for Their Economic Integration?

Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) face severe economic challenges. Which policy and programmatic approaches will be most effective in supporting IDPs to overcome these challenges and make progress toward self-reliance depends in part on the urban-rural composition of IDP populations. By analysing the existing known locations of IDPs in developing countries, we show that there is large variation in urban-rural IDP compositions across countries. 

Screenshot of the cover of the note
May 10, 2019

Where Do Internally Displaced People Live and What Does that Mean for Their Economic Integration?

Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) face severe economic challenges. Which policy and programmatic approaches will be most effective in supporting IDPs to overcome these challenges and make progress toward self-reliance depends in part on the urban-rural composition of IDP populations. By analysing the existing known locations of IDPs in developing countries and visualizing them in an interactive map, we show that there is large variation in urban-rural IDP compositions across countries.

Women pumping water at a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar. Photo: UN Women/Allison Joyce
February 7, 2019

Toward Medium-Term Solutions for Rohingya Refugees and Hosts in Bangladesh: Mapping Potential Responsibility-Sharing Contributions

Bangladesh is providing a significant global public good by hosting nearly one million Rohingya refugees, including 700,000 who fled violence carried out with “genocidal intent” in 2017. The international community has an opportunity to recognize Bangladesh’s contributions through a robust responsibility-sharing process. This brief explores the potential range of responsibility-sharing commitments in support of Bangladesh.