Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Publications

 

Cover of Exclusion, Gender and Education: Case Studies from the Developing World
September 24, 2007

Exclusion, Gender and Education: Case Studies from the Developing World

Girls have achieved remarkable increases in primary schooling over the past decade, yet millions are still not in school. In Inexcusable Absence, CGD visiting fellows Maureen Lewis and Marlaine Lockheed reported the startling new finding that nearly three-quarters of out-of-school girls belong to minority or otherwise marginalized groups. This companion volume further analyzes school enrollment, completion and learning with case studies in seven countries: Bangladesh, China, Guatemala, India, Laos, Pakistan, and Tunisia.

Cover of Global Warming and Agriculture: Impact Estimates by Country
September 12, 2007

Global Warming and Agriculture: Impact Estimates by Country

In this new book, Bill Cline, a joint senior fellow at CGD and the Peterson Institute for International Economics, provides the first ever estimates of the impact on agriculture by country, with a particular focus on the social and economic implications in China, India, Brazil, and the poor countries of the tropical belt in Africa and Latin America. His study shows that the long-term negative effects on world agriculture will be severe, and that developing countries will suffer first and worst.

Cover of Greater Than the Sum Of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States
June 15, 2007

Greater Than the Sum Of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States

Experience shows that outside efforts to help reform or reconstruct fragile states must simultaneously address issues of security, governance, and economic growth. Greater than the Sum of Its Parts? looks at how seven governments—the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Germany, France, and Sweden—are seeking to integrate their approach to fragile states. The authors find that "whole of government" approaches remain a work in progress and provide recommendations for how donors can best engage weak countries, including by experimenting with pooled funding arrangements, developing unified national strategies and by evaluating the impact of their interventions.

Stewart Patrick and Kaysie Brown
March 5, 2007

African Development: Making Sense of the Issues and Actors

Bill Easterly calls Moss's new introduction to Africa "compulsively readable and accessible" and "a masterpiece of clear thinking." Each chapter is organized around three fundamental questions: Where are we now? How did we get to this point? What are the current debates?

Cover of Harnessing Foreign Direct Investment: Policies for Developed and Developing Countries
January 12, 2007

Harnessing Foreign Direct Investment: Policies for Developed and Developing Countries

Does foreign direct investment (FDI) channel capital and know-how to developing countries? Or does it bring corruption and abuse of labor standards? Harnessing Foreign Direct Investment shows that FDI's contribution to development can be extremely powerful but that some forms of FDI, especially infrastructure, have serious adverse consequences. CGD non-resident fellow Theodore H. Moran shows for the first time how some investors circumvent the U.S. and host country laws and international treaties outlawing corrupt payments without risking prosecution, and offers recommendations on what to do about it.

Cover of Inexcusable Absence: Why 60 Million Girls Still Aren't In School and What to do About It
January 4, 2007

Inexcusable Absence: Why 60 Million Girls Still Aren't In School and What to do About It

Girls' education is widely recognized as crucial to development. Yet there has been surprisingly little hardheaded analysis about what is keeping girls out of school, and how to overcome these barriers. In Inexcusable Absence, Maureen Lewis and Marlaine Lockheed present new research showing that nearly three-quarters of the 60 million girls still not in school belong to ethnic, religious, linguistic, racial or other minorities. The authors then examine examples of success in helping these doubly disadvantaged girls to attend school and offer concrete proposals for new policies and programs.