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WP420 Cover
November 20, 2015

Changes in Funding Patterns by Latin American Banking Systems: How Large? How Risky? - Working Paper 420

This paper investigates the shifts in Latin American banks’ funding patterns in the post-global financial crisis period. To this end, we introduce a new measure of exposure of local banking systems to international debt markets that we term: International Debt Issuances by Locally Supervised Institutions. In contrast to well-known BIS measures, our new metric includes all entities that fall under the supervisory purview of the local authority.

Image: AP
March 3, 2015

Zimbabwe: From Hemorrhage to Stability, a Personal Journey

On a chilly Monday morning on February 16th, 2009, I walked into the New Government Complex in Harare’s Central Avenue. As I strode for the very first time down a poorly lit corridor, eyes strained and necks stretched behind wide open doors to catch a glimpse of the newcomer with a reputation for short temper. I was ushered into a comfortable office that was to become my home for the next four and a half years.

June 11, 2012

Competitiveness in Central America: The Road to Sustained Growth and Poverty Reduction

In this report, senior fellow Liliana Rojas-Suarez and José Luis Guasch, senior regional advisor on regulation and competition at the World Bank, investigate what donors can do to help Central America secure sustained growth, alleviate poverty, and reduce inequality, and what the role is for the private sector. They focus their recommendations on five areas in which policy changes can make Central American economies more competitive.

José Luis Guasch , Liliana Rojas-Suarez and Veronica Gonzales
April 20, 2012

The Global Financial Crisis: The Beginning of the End of the “Development” Agenda?

In this paper, written as the introduction to New Ideas on Development after the Financial Crisis (JHU Press, 2011), Nancy Birdsall discusses two themes. The first is the pre-crisis subtle shift in the prevailing model of capitalism in developing countries—away from orthodoxy or so-called market fundamentalism—that the crisis is likely to reinforce. The second theme is better framed as a question than a prediction: will the financial crisis, which is likely to be remembered as marking the end of Western economic dominance, be a trigger for a new twenty-first-century approach to collective action on global problems?

March 3, 2011

The Post-Washington Consensus: Development after the Crisis - Working Paper 244

The last time a global depression originated in the United States, the impact was devastating not only for the world economy but for world politics as well. The Great Depression set the stage for a shift away from strict monetarism and laissez-faire policies toward Keynesian demand management. More important, for many it delegitimized the capitalist system itself, paving the way for the rise of radical and antiliberal movements around the world.

October 7, 2010

Austerity and the IMF

Kenneth Rogoff delivers the Fifth Annual Richard H. Sabot Lecture on April 12, 2010.

Kenneth Rogoff
June 8, 2010

Proposal for an IDA Blended Financing Facility (Policy Memo)

Against the backdrop of the fast approaching Millennium Development Goals deadline, World Bank shareholders have an opportunity to dramatically increase resources available for the poorest, most vulnerable countries. By better leveraging the IBRD’s balance sheet for creditworthy blend and hardened term countries, IDA could have provided up to an additional $7.5 billion for IDA-only countries during the IDA-15 period.

February 8, 2010

Financial Integration and Foreign Banks in Latin America: Do They Amplify External Financial Shocks? - Working Paper 203

This paper explores the impact of international financial integration on credit markets in Latin America. The overall effect is positive, but the foreign banks do tend to amplify the impact of foreign shocks on credit and interest rates. Important policy recommendations include ring-fencing mechanisms, early-warning systems, and the incorporation for agreements between domestic and foreign supervisors.

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