Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Publications

 

August 19, 2009

The Illusion of Equality: The Educational Consequences of Blinding Weak States, For Example - Working Paper 178

Efforts to decentralize educational systems often arouse fears that the quality of schooling will become less equal as a result. But what’s the evidence? CGD non-resident fellow Lant Pritchett and co-author Martina Viarengo show in a new CGD working paper that the supposedly greater equality of centralized systems is often little more than the illusion of a bureaucracy blinded to local realities.

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Martina Viarengo
March 21, 2009

Schooling Inequality, Crises, and Financial Liberalization in Latin America - Working Paper 165

This working paper examines the relationship between high inequality and liberalization of the financial sector in Latin America from 1975 to 2000. Using panel data, the authors find that increases in financial liberalization were associated with bank crises and other domestic and external shocks, and that higher schooling inequality reduces the impetus for liberalization brought on by bank crises.

Jere R. Behrman and Gunilla Pettersson
March 2, 2009

We Don't Need No Education? Why the United States Should Take the Lead on Global Education

UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown and U.S. President Barack Obama are both committed to boosting funding for global education. CGD visiting fellow Desmond Bermingham, the former head of the Education for All–Fast Track Initiative, offers suggestions about making the most of additional U.S. assistance for the two leaders to consider when they meet this week in the White House.

January 5, 2009

Pricing and Access: Lessons from Randomized Evaluations in Education and Health - Working Paper 158

The debate on user fees in health and education has been contentious, but until recently much of the evidence has been anecdotal. Does charging poor people for health and education services improve or impede access? CGD non-resident fellow Michael Kremer and co-author Alaka Holla survey the evidence from recent randomized evaluations across a variety of settings to find out. The verdict: higher prices decrease access.

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Alaka Holla and Michael Kremer