Events

Each year the Center for Global Development hosts more than 80 public and invitation-only events. These events range from private roundtables to small seminars to book launches and other large public forums. The Center continues to host two popular on-going event series, the CGD Invited Research Forum (formerly the Massachusetts Avenue Development Seminars) and Global Development Matters, our summer movie night series. If you would like more information about CGD events or are interested in renting our conference space, please send us an e-mail. You can subscribe to an RSS feed of upcoming events, and view our event photo archives on flickr.

Putting ‘Pay-for-Performance’ to the Test: The Effects of Rewarding Teacher Attendance in Uganda

10/23/14

Financial incentives may reduce teacher absence and improve student performance, but they may also lead teachers and schools to simply exaggerate attendance. Zeitlin and co-authors report on an experiment in Uganda that combined pay-for-performance for teachers with a separate experiment that enlisted local parents to independently monitor teacher absence and report back via mobile phone.

When teachers were paid for attending school, their actual attendance increased, and so did the number of false reports. But the increase in bad information was more than offset by an increase in total information from parental monitoring, providing administrators with a more reliable overall picture of teacher absence. Despite inducing false reports, the results suggest that social welfare was higher with financial incentives.

CGD Europe Research Seminar: Taxing Across Borders: Tracking Personal Wealth and Corporate Profits

10/23/14

How much wealth is being held in overseas tax havens? In a new paper, forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, Gabriel Zucman uses a variety of data sources to estimate the total magnitude of both corporate profits and personal wealth held in offshore tax havens.

Relying on both balance of payments (BOP) and National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) data, Professor Zucman estimates that the rate of corporate tax avoidance has grown by more than tenfold in the past 20-30 years, contributing to a substantial drop in effective corporate taxation. Drawing on previous work, Zucman also finds that 8% of global household financial wealth is held overseas to avoid tax. After highlighting the significant loss in government revenue driven by tax avoidance, Zucman argues that the many of these losses might be addressed with the creation of a world financial registry.

*The CGD Europe Research Seminars are a series that brings some of the world's leading development scholars to discuss their new research and ideas. The presentations aim to meet an academic standard of quality and are at times technical, and retain a focus on a mixed audience of researchers and policy-makers. A light lunch will be provided.

 

CGD Europe Research Seminar: What Happens When a Woman Wins a Close Election? Evidence from Brazil

10/31/14

What happens when a woman wins an election in an environment dominated by male politicians? In a recent paper with her co-author Ugo Troiano, Dr. Fernanda Brollo studies the different policies that female mayors choose when governing Brazilian Municipalities. To isolate precisely the differences in mayoral candidates, Brollo focuses on municipalities with very close elections between male and female candidates, comparing those where a man barely won to those where a women barely won. 

Using this approach, Brollo finds that municipalities with female mayors receive more discretionary transfers from the federal government, and that female mayors perform better on both health outcomes and corruption. Despite the apparent benefits of having women win elections, female mayors are substantially less likely to win re-election, and evidence suggests that their male counter-parts are more likely to use political patronage to win again.

The CGD Europe Research Seminars are a series that brings some of the world's leading development scholars to discuss their new research and ideas. The presentations aim to meet an academic standard of quality and are at times technical, and retain a focus on a mixed audience of researchers and policy-makers. A light lunch will be provided.