Tag: Illicit Finance

 

India Prime Minister Enacts Bold Policy to Cut Down on “Black Money”

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s announced a bold measure on Wednesday to reduce the role of unaccounted for cash or “black money” in the country’s economy by “de-monetizing” higher-denomination currency notes. The new policy bans the use of 500 rupee and 1,000 rupee currency notes. While this measure may have the positive (though potentially temporary) effect of forcing illicit activity out of the regulated economy, the process could be disorderly, with the poorest members of society bearing the brunt of the disruption.

Destination Havana: Getting Investment Flowing Might Be Tougher Than You Think

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Lifting the trade and investment embargo on Cuba is a laudable policy objective that would allow Cubans better access to American goods and services. It might also give American businesses a boost, including from places that could do with one, like rural Louisiana. Changing the law will be an uphill struggle unless November’s elections transform Congress. But even if Congress can agree, changes to the law might not be sufficient to convince investors to go to Cuba.

Malawi Can’t Afford Evidence-Free Tax Campaigns

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Over the past couple of weeks Malawi has become the latest poster child for UK campaigns arguing that changes to the international tax system can deliver outsize returns for development. Specifically, Action Aid is calling on the UK government to renegotiate a 60-year-old tax treaty. Questions were also raised about this issue in the House of Commons.

Two World Bank Surveys Provide (Imperfect) Evidence that De-risking Might Be Hurting Developing Countries

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The World Bank recently released the results of two separate surveys aimed at gauging the extent to which de-risking is a problem. The headline result is that banks around the world are closing accounts of money transfer organizations (MTOs) and are severing links with banks in other countries.  These careful, timely reports provide crucial evidence that de-risking is a very real phenomenon and that we should be worried about it.

A Call for Action on De-Risking – Podcast with US Treasury Under Secretary Nathan Sheets

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Recently, CGD launched a major report about how laws designed to prevent money being sent overseas to terrorists and criminals can also have unintended consequences for innocent people in developing countries. Dr. Nathan Sheets, US Under Secretary of Treasury for International Affairs, called for banks and policymakers to "commit significant resources and take on new responsibilities" in order to address this challenge.

US Treasury Under Secretary Nathan Sheets Calls for Action on De-risking at CGD Report Launch Event

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Last Thursday, Under Secretary of the US Treasury Nathan Sheets spoke at CGD about anti–money laundering policies and the problem of de-risking, in connection with the launch of a new CGD working group report on the unintended consequences of anti–money laundering policies for poor countries. Sheets’s comments were consistent with the report’s key recommendations including the need for better data and for clearer guidance from financial regulators and standards setters.

Are Anti–Money Laundering Policies Hurting Poor Countries? – New CGD Working Group Report

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Next week, the G-20 Leaders will meet in Antalya, Turkey, to continue their conversation about the importance of financial inclusion in achieving strong, sustainable, balanced economic growth. One item on the agenda will be the cost of remittances. In 2009, G-8 Leaders set a goal of reducing remittance costs to 5 percent within 5 years, roughly a 5 percentage point decrease.

Talking about Tax Is Taxing: Pretending It Is Simple Will Hurt the Poor

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Here’s an obvious truth: tax lost to trade misinvoicing in Africa does not equal tax lost to transfer mispricing by multinational corporations in Sierra Leone, which does not equal lost health-care spending. Unfortunately, a policy paper released on Tuesday by Oxfam makes exactly these equivalences. This sort of imprecision is widespread, and it’s not going to help the poor.

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