Tag: Migration

 

Remittance Economics 101 for Populist Politicians

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Around 1900, many claimed that Italian immigrants were harming the US by sending money abroad. All the way back to 1728, Jonathan Swift believed that outflows of money hurt Ireland. The idea keeps coming back because, if you think about it for a minute, it makes sense. Money buys stuff, and if it buys Mexican stuff, it’s not buying American stuff. But if you think about it for one more minute, it falls apart. Here is a basic course in the economics of remittances for populist politicians. 

Strange Bedfellows – Politics of Immigration Policy in the 2016 Presidential Election

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Spoiler alert: this is not a blog post about #DumpTrump. However, the 2016 U.S. presidential election – and last week’s Republican debate – demonstrates an increasing focus on U.S. immigration policy and reform. While many candidates are sticking to the oft-repeated refrain of ‘border security first,’ some have taken unexpected stands.

The White House and the World 2016

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Why should global development policy be important to the next US President? This is what we’re asking in today’s CGD Podcast. And what should the next administration do to make sure the US retains and reinforces its influence with developing nations?

Migration into Europe: A Problem with No Solution

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One needs just to look at the newspaper headlines to see that the problem of migrants is growing daily in Europe and that its gravity is greater than before. The number of migrants this year has already exceeded 100,000 (about 15 percent higher than the last, record, year);  the number of the dead has reached at least several thousand although the statistics are murky since no one has incentive to compile them. People just die in desert or sea and no one cares. Practically every European country thinks about either deporting the migrants, making the asylum laws more difficult, or simply shutting the borders. 

The Upside of Accepting Refugees

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The media often characterize immigrants and refugees as a burden, according to my guest this week, CGD board member and former deputy secretary-general of the UN Mark Malloch Brown. Lord Malloch-Brown says that past experience shows that refugees not only land on their feet after fleeing their circumstances, but are a “shot in the arm” to the economies of countries they arrive in.

This Is It on Migration at Addis?

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Lant recently blogged on the weak language on migration in the draft Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  If we want a just, equitable, and inclusive world, the most powerful tool at our disposal is migration. And yet the best the SDGs can do is call for countries to “facilitate orderly, safe, regular, and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.” 

Labor Mobility and Migration: The Missing Heart of the Sustainable Development Goals

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Imagine you are a Guatemalan living and working in the United States without the proper documents.  Almost certainly (because it is legally required) there is a poster in the place where you work—most likely in English and Spanish—that “Equal Opportunity is the Law” and that you are protected from discrimination “on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), or national origin.”  

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