Tag: Data & Transparency

 

Making Gender Data Count: Can IATI Help?

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CGD recently co-hosted a workshop with Data2Xthe Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), and Development Gateway on the potential of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) to comprehensively track aid flows and outcomes. Specifically, the discussion explored how IATI can be used to improve the availability of gender data and ensure that women and girls benefit equally from development investments. A full summary note of the workshop can be found here—and in short form, here’s what we learned from the discussion.

How Transparent Are Development Finance Institutions?

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Foreign assistance has come a long way in becoming much more transparent.  The idea, pushed by campaigns like Publish What You Fund and embodied in the International Aid Transparency Initiative, is that being more open about concessional aid will lead to less waste and more accountability. So what about non-concessional development finance? As the importance of development finance institutions (DFIs) grows, how transparent are they?

MCC Says Data Is in Its DNA—Show Us You Mean It by Using It Right

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The country scorecards that serve as the basis for MCC country eligibility decisions aren’t complete, but the data for the particularly weighty indicators—including the must-pass Control of Corruption hurdle—is now available. I ran the numbers to get a sneak peek at some of the issues the agency and its board will grapple with over the next few months. Some of what emerged from this number crunching is encouraging—most current partner countries surpass MCC’s standards and some interesting new prospects for partnership emerge. More troubling is that two of the countries currently developing compacts—Kosovo and Mongolia—don’t pass the corruption hurdle.

Four Comments and a Suggestion for the World Bank Board

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Last week the World Bank Board closed the three-week window, announced in late August, for member countries to nominate candidates for the presidency of the World Bank. Jim Kim, the US nominee and incumbent since his election in 2012, was formally nominated by the United States at 12:01 a.m. at the opening bell, so to speak. He is the sole candidate in what appears to have been a kind of insider coup by the United States (called a “charade” in a World Bank Staff Association letter to its members) of the procedures agreed by World Bank members in 2011.

Water Water Everywhere? A World Water Week Q&A with Louis Boorstin

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In his previous role as head of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Louis Boorstin worked to co-invest with the World Bank in at-scale programs that would be rigorously evaluated. The unique result: lives saved in the real world, measured rigorously, with lessons about what did and didn’t work so well. As experts, practitioners, and advocates gather in Stockholm to celebrate World Water Week, here’s a Q&A with Louis—in his own words—on what he’s learned from his experience:

What Can International Development Learn from Britain’s Olympic Team?

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There is a lot of chatter about the reasons for Britain’s relative success in the Olympic games. This transformation in Britain’s sporting performance has generated a raft of tortured analogies with various non-sporting challenges, such as industrial and education policies (on which Britain’s performance is rather less stellar). So I’m leaping on the bandwagon with two lessons for international development.

Why Registration and ID Are Gender Equality Issues

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CGD, along with Data2X and the World Bank Group, recently hosted an event on the intersections of civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS), legal identification, and gender equality. That sounds like a mouthful, to be sure, but it all comes down to one simple idea: both men and women need to be able to prove who they are, so that they can exercise their rights as citizens and be counted by their governments.

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