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Tag: Finance

 

Saving Forests in Paris: Breakthrough for REDD+?

Blog Post

The historic UN “Paris Agreement” achieved by climate change negotiators highlighted the importance of conserving forests and laid the groundwork for future global carbon markets to finance emissions reductions from tropical forest countries.  But a full-fledged carbon market-based mechanism to protect forests and reduce rampant deforestation is still years down the road.  In the meantime, reducing emissions from deforestation will continue to depend on a medley of public and private financing appr

How to Make Fiscal Transfers Work for Better Health

Blog Post

India matters for global health. It accounts not only for about one-fifth of the global population, but also one-fifth of the global disease burden. Yet the Indian government spends only 1 percent of its GDP on public health—a paltry amount compared to what other large, federal countries like Brazil and China allocate (4.7 percent and 3.1 percent, respectively). This has a direct impact on Indian citizens who pay more out-of-pocket for health care than citizens in any other G20 country.

Four Challenges for Blended Finance and Development Finance Institutions

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Overseas development assistance amounts to about $135 billion dollars annually, but the cost of paying for the Sustainable Development Goals will be in the trillions. As a result, blended finance is something of a buzz phrase these days. I left a workshop on blended finance last week in Paris excited about the potential of these new structures and instruments to deliver social returns. But I was also struck by the challenges DFIs and their advocates must overcome in order to fully realize that potential. 

Financing for Adaptation to Climate Change: Ensuring the Most Vulnerable Are Covered

Blog Post

At next week’s global climate summit in Paris the mood is likely to be somber in the wake of the devastating terrorist attacks. Spirits won’t be raised by the fact that the national emissions reduction plans submitted so far are only half of what’s needed to keep global temperature increases within the agreed target of 2 degrees Celsius.  Also discouraging are the large gaps that remain between how much climate finance developing countries need to cover the costs of mitigation and adaptation and the commitments put forward by developed countries.

A Call for Action on De-Risking – Podcast with US Treasury Under Secretary Nathan Sheets

Blog Post

Recently, CGD launched a major report about how laws designed to prevent money being sent overseas to terrorists and criminals can also have unintended consequences for innocent people in developing countries.

These laws impose huge fines on financial institutions that have done business with a dodgy client – knowingly or not. To avoid the risk of these fines, banks pull out of markets they see as potentially risky. That tends to mean developing countries.

US Treasury Under Secretary Nathan Sheets Calls for Action on De-risking at CGD Report Launch Event

Blog Post

Last Thursday, Under Secretary of the US Treasury Nathan Sheets spoke at CGD about anti–money laundering policies and the problem of de-risking, in connection with the launch of a new CGD working group report on the unintended consequences of anti–money laundering policies for poor countries. Sheets’s comments were consistent with the report’s key recommendations including the need for better data and for clearer guidance from financial regulators and standards setters.

Are Anti–Money Laundering Policies Hurting Poor Countries? – Podcast with Clay Lowery and Vijaya Ramachandran

Blog Post

Are laws designed to prevent money laundering, terrorism-finance and sanctions violations unintentionally hurting people in poor countries? That’s the question a recent CGD Report seeks to address. Anti-money laundering/combating the finance of terrorism laws (AML/CFT) are grounded in reasonable national security concerns – to prevent the cross-border flow of funds to terror or criminal groups. Banks, if unable to identify the end-customer of an international transaction, could find themselves (unwittingly or not) in breach of these laws, and facing stiff penalties.

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