Tag: Finance


How Transparent Are Development Finance Institutions?

Blog Post

Foreign assistance has come a long way in becoming much more transparent.  The idea, pushed by campaigns like Publish What You Fund and embodied in the International Aid Transparency Initiative, is that being more open about concessional aid will lead to less waste and more accountability. So what about non-concessional development finance? As the importance of development finance institutions (DFIs) grows, how transparent are they?

One Year into the SDGs, Six Ideas To Leverage The Private Sector

Blog Post

“Private sector” appears 18 times in the outcome document from last year’s UN financing for development conference in Addis Ababa—exactly the same number of times as “international cooperation.” As we approach the first anniversary of the world signing up to the SDGs, where are the ideas that bring private sector ingenuity and capital to delivering them? In the coming weeks, we’re going to tell you about six.

Dude, Where’s My Cat Bond?

Blog Post

 “Cat” bonds are effectively a cheaper source of large-scale insurance coverage against clearly measured risks like earthquakes, storms, or even disease outbreaks. Generally, though, coverage hasn’t trickled down to the poorer and most at-risk countries—precisely those which are most vulnerable when aid fails to arrive or arrives piecemeal. Scaling up this market for lower-income countries would provide better shielding against many risks that undermine development overseas.

Progress Towards Reducing the Unintended Consequences of Anti-Money Laundering Policies for Poor Countries

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Last November, we released a report on the unintended consequences of anti-money laundering policies for poor countries that focused on remittances, corresponding banking, and the delivery of humanitarian aid. Today, we are pleased to report progress towards reducing the negative, unintended consequences of anti-money laundering (AML) regulation, despite the shadow cast on the international development community by Brexit. One significant policy change from the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and three new reports give us reasons to celebrate a little, even when there is much work to be done.