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Tag: energy access


Three Energy Hopes for the G-20

Blog Post

“Energy Sustainability” is high on the agenda for the G-20 meeting in Antalya, Turkey, next week. In practice, this means the governments of the world’s leading economies will pledge to continue the laudable goals of phasing out inefficient subsides and boosting energy efficiency. But the meatier agenda is two wonkier research items. According to the Turkish presidency priorities communiqué (PDF), the G-20 will “study the reasons behind the high cost of renewable energy investment and examine the deployment of public and private resources to fulfill the need for energy investment.”

Why Is DfID Pushing Solar-Only When Africans Say They Want On-Grid Electricity?

Blog Post

Yesterday the UK government formally launched its much-awaited Energy Africa campaign, which aims to accelerate electricity access for rural Africans. In a surprise move, DfID’s new plans include only support for small-scale solar power solutions. Typically these systems provide just enough power for a LED light bulb or two and a cellphone charger (see here and here for a few DfID favorites).

MCC Serves Up a Half-Baked Compact

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MCC will soon ask its board of directors to vote on a proposed $473 million second compact for Tanzania.  The program focuses on the energy sector, making it a big deliverable for Power Africa.  It’s also strongly aligned with the priorities of Tanzanian citizens, businesses, and the government.  But, as the compact currently stands, there are some pretty significant gaps, making it hard for the board to know just what it’s approving.  Most notably, it’s completely lac

Here’s a Better Way the SDGs Can #LightTheWay to End Poverty

Blog Post

A campaign to rally public support for the Sustainable Development Goals is calling upon people to #LightTheWay to fight poverty. It’s a lovely image: millions of people holding “candles, lanterns, and torches!” to urge world leaders as they meet in New York to make commitments to make the world a better place. Light is a symbol rich in religious connotations and evocative of human progress.

Obama’s Legacy in Africa – Lacking or Lasting?

Blog Post

President Obama is wheels up to Kenya and Ethiopia. Likely his last trip to the continent as president, Charles Kenny and Todd Moss each take this moment to assess his legacy in Africa thus far—and identify where there are still opportunities.

Here is Charles in Bloomberg.

Here is Todd in CNN.

They’re worth reading in tandem. Both see the president’s legacy on the continent thus far as lacking, if for somewhat different reasons, and both identify different possibilities for driving a lasting legacy. But it’s safe to say both are hopeful there will not be another soccket

DFID’s “Energy Africa” Campaign Launch: Three Fast Facts, One Bad Idea, and at Least One Way Forward

Blog Post

On Monday, Grant Shapps, the UK's Minister of State at the Department for International Development, kicked off DFID’s Energy Africa campaign at an event hosted by the Shell Foundation designed to help his team figure out how the UK government can invest its political clout and an initial £30 million ($46 million) to tackle rural energy poverty in Africa. Given solar’s limitations and these risks, how can we make sure that Energy Africa fulfils Minister Shapps’s ambitious brief?

US Energy Policy Hypocrisy vs. Global Energy Poverty

Blog Post

The Electrify Africa Act is back, re-vamped for 2015 and a new session of Congress. Representatives Royce, Engel, and Bass introduced the bill this week (the House passed an earlier version last year, but the Senate didn’t vote on corresponding legislation before the end of the last congressional session). It includes many important provisions that aim to help African countries extend access to electricity to at least 50 million people by 2020.