Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Tag: HIV/AIDS

 

PEPFAR Teams Are Designing Impact Evaluations: Retrospective, Prospective, and Randomized

Last year, PEPFAR submitted guidelines which encouraged country staff to submit a proposal to conduct an “impact evaluation” (IE) as part of their annual Country Operation Plan (COP).  Subsequently, they received four submissions, of which three were funded.  But they also learned that many PEPFAR staff – who are mostly program implementers, or the managers of program implementers – didn’t fully understand what they were being asked to do; what does PEPFAR mean by “impact evaluations”?

Sneak Preview: CDC’s Effort to Measure the Determinants of AIDS Treatment Quality

It’s one thing to measure the quality of AIDS care; it’s another to understand how to improve it.  Our last blog showed how the metaphor of the “treatment cascade” can be a useful way to conceptualize and measure the quality of AIDS care and that PEPFAR supported care has room for improvement on this measure (see more on the treatment cascade here). In order to achieve the health benefits that would result from reducing patient attrition over the course of the treatment cascade, PEPFAR and its partners need to learn why some facilities do better than others and what factors contributors to treatment success. 

A Question of Quality: Why Retention Matters for AIDS Treatment

Counting the number of patients on treatment is no longer enough.  For years even the friendliest critics of the global struggle against AIDS have pointed out that this metric unfairly neglects the people who are not put on treatment and then die, largely because their deaths are uncounted except in so far as they increase the treatment “coverage rate.”  This diverts attention from the challenge of assuring that patients are retained on treatment and remain alive and healthy, rather than failing treatment and dying, sometimes after only a few months.  

PEPFAR 3.0: The Easiest Decision for Congress This Week

Policy makers on Capitol Hill have some pressing policy issues to tackle in the coming weeks (like reaching an agreement to fund the government and raising the debt ceiling). Fortunately, one bill that landed on their desk last week shouldn’t require much debate:  The PEPFAR Stewardship and Oversight Act of 2013.

Multilateralism-lite Might Miss the Big Picture

This is a joint post with Jenny Ottenhoff.

My colleague Scott Morris pointed out in a recent blog that the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria will likely surpass the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) as the single largest foreign assistance contribution the United States makes to a multilateral institution.  He described this move as “multilateralism-lite” – or a reliance on earmarking through multilateral channels by sector or country – and suggests this isn’t an optimal approach to poverty reduction and development.

PEPFAR at 10

This is a joint post with Jenny Ottenhoff.

Ten years ago – on May 27, 2003 – the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief was born with the stroke of a pen by President George W. Bush.  Over the last decade, the program has experienced tremendous growth and made inroads against HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria in some of the world’s hardest hit areas.  And through it all, PEPFAR managed to maintain bi-partisan support that bridged two US Administrations, six US congressional sessions, and one global economic crisis.

Pages