Ideas to Action:

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Migration

migration

The migration component of the CDI compares rich countries on how easy they make it for people from poor ones to immigrate, get education or find work, send home money, and even return home with new skills and capital.



Europe's Migration Policies

Europe’s top performers on Migration

  Austria

Large increase during the 1990s in unskilled immigrants from the former Yugoslavia

  Norway

Free tuition for foreign students and for nationals

  Switzerland

Bears large share of the burden of refugees during humanitarian crises

  Sweden

Large number of immigrants from developing countries

Europe’s lowest performers on Migration

  Slovakia

Small share of foreign students are from developing countries; and tuition for foreign students is higher than for nationals

  Poland

Only a small increase during the 1990s in the number of unskilled immigrants from developing countries

  Czech   Republic

Bears small share of the burden of refugees during humanitarian crises

  Hungary

Small share of foreign students are from developing countries




The migration component rewards countries which accept unskilled immigrants from developing countries as well as those which receive refugees during a humanitarian crisis.
Migration policy towards development countries is largely determined by individual member states, rather than the European Union. European performance has gradually drifted down over the years, perhaps reflecting growing political concerns about immigration in some European countries, but a few small European countries still maintain a strong standing at the top of the ranking.

For more on migration, explore the migration and development topic, related publications, and experts.

Read the Europe Beyond Aid Working Paper.

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