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Views from the Center

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis to improve international development policy. Also check out our Global Health blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

A building in a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Two Years On, and No End in Sight: How Should We Respond to the Rohingya Crisis in the Medium-Term?

This Sunday marks two years since Myanmar’s military dramatically escalated its systematic campaign of violence against the Rohingya, causing over 700,000 of the long-persecuted and stateless population to flee to Bangladesh. Even if repatriation began tomorrow, estimates suggest a significant number of refugees would remain in Bangladesh over ten years from now. The international community and Bangladesh can’t afford to just plan for the short term.

A room full of internally displaced people in Myanmar, with three women up from

Where Internally Displaced People Live & Three Ways To Support Their Economic Success

There are over 68.5 million forcibly displaced people in the world, including about 40 million Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) who have moved because of conflict or other drivers, including disasters, economic instability, and development projects such as infrastructure construction. To support them in overcoming these challenges, policymakers should focus on helping IDPs achieve greater self-reliance. The best approach to doing so will depend in large part upon the extent to which IDP populations are based in urban or rural areas.

 
Bogotá

Making GCFF Financing a Win for Venezuelans and Their Colombian Hosts

As dueling claims to the Venezuela’s presidency threaten to spark further violence and devastating economic and social turmoil accelerates, the exodus of Venezuelan migrants continues. In a context of increasing pressure and the possibility of larger inflows, the World Bank recently announced that Colombia is now the third country to be eligible for the Global Concessional Financing Facility (GCFF)—a partnership among the World Bank, United Nations, Islamic Development Bank, and others. The GCFF, which is hosted by the World Bank, offers highly concessional financing to middle-income countries hosting significant numbers of refugees. But financing is just the first step. It’s critical to learn lessons from past experience and ensure that policies are in place so that financing yields results and promotes self-reliance.