Tag: Data & Transparency

 

Making Blockchain Technology Work for Development: The Need for Data and Dialogue

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While blockchain-based solutions have the potential to increase efficiency and improve outcomes dramatically in some use cases and more marginally (if at all) in others, key constraints must be resolved before blockchain technology can meet its full potential in this space. Overcoming these constraints will require increased dialogue between the development and technology communities and a stronger commitment to collecting and sharing data about what’s working and what isn’t in pilot projects that use the technology.

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Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of blockchain technology to address long-standing challenges related to economic development. This paper provides a clear-eyed view of the technology’s potential in the context of development. It focuses on identifying the questions that development practitioners should be asking technologists, and challenges that innovators must address for the technology to meet its potential.

Three Reasons the Spring Meetings Remained Glum—Despite Better Global Economic News

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Each year, as ministers gather from all corners of the world for the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings, Washington DC resounds with a cacophony of differing perspectives on future prospects, like a giant, multinational orchestra tuning up. Yet this time, in both public and private gatherings, with both developed and developing country dignitaries, as well as leading technocrats from the international financial institutions, one refrain kept recurring, defining the mood of the whole symphony. I would summarize it as 'The numbers are looking better, so why don't I feel good about them?'

Bridging the Humanitarian-Development Divide: Three Priorities from Three Global Leaders

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How can the world find realistic, workable solutions to bridge the divide between humanitarian response and development assistance? This question was front and center at a high-level discussion, co-hosted by CGD and the International Rescue Committee (IRC), in the run up to last week’s Spring Meetings. The event marked the launch of a new CGD-IRC report, which puts forth one emerging solution to the refugee crisis—compact agreements between host governments and development and humanitarian actors. The discussion featured three global leaders on the frontline of today’s displacement challenge: Jordan’s Minister of Planning and International Cooperation Imad Fakhoury, World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva, and IRC President and CEO David Miliband. Here are three takeaways.

Making Gender Data Count: Can IATI Help?

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CGD recently co-hosted a workshop with Data2Xthe Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), and Development Gateway on the potential of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) to comprehensively track aid flows and outcomes. Specifically, the discussion explored how IATI can be used to improve the availability of gender data and ensure that women and girls benefit equally from development investments. A full summary note of the workshop can be found here—and in short form, here’s what we learned from the discussion.

How Transparent Are Development Finance Institutions?

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Foreign assistance has come a long way in becoming much more transparent.  The idea, pushed by campaigns like Publish What You Fund and embodied in the International Aid Transparency Initiative, is that being more open about concessional aid will lead to less waste and more accountability. So what about non-concessional development finance? As the importance of development finance institutions (DFIs) grows, how transparent are they?

MCC Says Data Is in Its DNA—Show Us You Mean It by Using It Right

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The country scorecards that serve as the basis for MCC country eligibility decisions aren’t complete, but the data for the particularly weighty indicators—including the must-pass Control of Corruption hurdle—is now available. I ran the numbers to get a sneak peek at some of the issues the agency and its board will grapple with over the next few months. Some of what emerged from this number crunching is encouraging—most current partner countries surpass MCC’s standards and some interesting new prospects for partnership emerge. More troubling is that two of the countries currently developing compacts—Kosovo and Mongolia—don’t pass the corruption hurdle.

Four Comments and a Suggestion for the World Bank Board

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Last week the World Bank Board closed the three-week window, announced in late August, for member countries to nominate candidates for the presidency of the World Bank. Jim Kim, the US nominee and incumbent since his election in 2012, was formally nominated by the United States at 12:01 a.m. at the opening bell, so to speak. He is the sole candidate in what appears to have been a kind of insider coup by the United States (called a “charade” in a World Bank Staff Association letter to its members) of the procedures agreed by World Bank members in 2011.

Water Water Everywhere? A World Water Week Q&A with Louis Boorstin

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In his previous role as head of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Louis Boorstin worked to co-invest with the World Bank in at-scale programs that would be rigorously evaluated. The unique result: lives saved in the real world, measured rigorously, with lessons about what did and didn’t work so well. As experts, practitioners, and advocates gather in Stockholm to celebrate World Water Week, here’s a Q&A with Louis—in his own words—on what he’s learned from his experience:

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