Moonshot in a Minute

 
For the past 20 years, the Center for Global Development has distinguished itself by turning innovative ideas backed by rigorous research into action. In our Moonshot in a Minute video series, CGD experts have 60 seconds to share their big ideas to change minds, change policy, and change the world.

Through the challenges of the past two decades, the Center for Global Development has been there with cutting-edge solutions. Whether it was helping to establish a new full-service development finance institution in the United States or devising a global blueprint—called Advance Market Commitments—to speed up vaccine access in low- and middle-income countries that is now being applied to the COVID-19 crisis, the Center for Global Development was pushing ideas before they became popular, simply because they were good policy.

Learn more about some of our latest innovative ideas below.
 

What if we could pave Africa's roads?

As Liberia's Minister of Public Works, Gyude Moore saw how the lack of paved roads reduces access to markets and social services and undermines the quality of life for many Africans. Here at CGD, we’re working on combining an advance market commitment with a prize challenge to incentivize the paving of roads, which will boost intra-continental trade in Africa, decrease overland travel time, and connect people to markets, schools, and health facilities.

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What if women didn’t have to spend billions of hours working for free?

Last year, women spent three times as many hours as men doing additional unpaid childcare.

CGD is working to identify the best policies and practices to improve the global care economy. Our evidence-based proposals are already being adopted by some of the influential decision makers - from the World Bank to the US government.

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What if we could eliminate lead poisoning as a threat to all children?

800 million children around the world with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood—harming their health, stymying their learning, and preventing them from reaching their full human potential.

Yet here’s the good news: the almost complete elimination of lead poisoning in the US and Europe shows this is a solvable problem. With better research, more funding, parent/community awareness, and policymaker prioritization, we think the world could dramatically reduce—and eventually even eliminate—lead poisoning as a threat to all children. And we think we owe it to the world’s children to get started immediately.

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