Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

Global Health Policy Blog

CGD experts offer ideas and analysis on global health issues and how better policies can improve well-being for everyone. Also check out our Views from the Center blog and US Development Policy blog.

 

A child receives the oral Polio vaccine at a clinic in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Photo by Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Gavi@20: What’s Next for Global Immunization Efforts

The Board of Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, will retreat next week to discuss a new strategy and replenishment. My colleagues and I have put together a preliminary set of six short notes that examine different dimensions of Gavi’s work and make recommendations for ways to address identified issues.

A table showing the change in PEPFAR funding across different budget requests and budgets

With Budget Cuts Looming Again, Can PEPFAR Keep the Gas on its Acceleration Strategy?

PEPFAR has long enjoyed bipartisan support on the Hill. Yet, it has not been spared from significant cuts in President Trump’s latest budget request for foreign aid. It is noteworthy that this administration’s three successive budget requests have proposed increasingly large cuts to PEPFAR’s funding. If past is prelude, a cut of this magnitude is unlikely to materialize in any final spending bill.

scale with question mark

The Right Tools for the Job: When to Use CEA and When to Use BCA for Evaluating Health Policies

As countries strive to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including attaining and sustaining universal health coverage, decision-makers are increasingly using economic evaluation to drive macro policy choices and more granular technology-focused decisions. In a recent study, we discuss what cost-effective analysis (CEA) and benefit-cost analysis (BCA) have in common and where they differ, especially in relation to universal health coverage, in terms of the perspective of the analysis and how the methodologies relate (or not) to the viewpoints of healthcare policymakers and budget holders in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Photo of pills

On World AIDS Day, a Moment for Celebration and Self-Reflection

On World AIDS Day, December 1, we honor the advocates that transformed HIV/AIDS from a death sentence to a chronic disease. These activists bequeathed a golden age of global health—a boom in money and programs that is sustained today, evidenced by the recent reauthorization of PEPFAR. But as UNAIDS recognized last year, we still have miles to go despite this extraordinary mobilization. Even today, 40 percent of people in need still lack lifesaving antiretroviral treatment.

A hand reaching for medicine on a pharmacy shelf

Are Other Countries to Blame for High US Drug Prices?

Back in February, the US Council of Economic Advisers issued a white paper on drug pricing implying that other rich countries should stop “free riding” off American innovation by negotiating drug prices to unfairly low levels after the US fronts the research and development costs. Perhaps in response, President Trump recently announced a proposal to bring down US drug prices. But until the US corrects the structural flaws in its own healthcare system, these efforts are bound to fall short.

virus

Financing Outbreak Preparedness: Where Are We and What Next?

This week, global leaders gathered at the 5th Global Health Security Agenda Ministerial Meetings in Bali under the overarching theme of “advancing global partnerships” for greater health security. Alongside this event, the World Bank hosted a discussion on preparedness financing at the country level. The panel acknowledged that while countries have begun to pay more attention to pandemic preparedness, much work remains to increase domestic and donor support to national preparedness systems. As the discussions wrap up in Bali and the World Bank heads to its IDA18 midterm review in Zambia next week, we share a few thoughts.

pills

Entrepreneurship on the Rise in the Medical Supply Chain in Africa: A Tale of Four Pharmacy Disruptors

The IFC estimates that by 2030, developing countries will need up to $210 billion per year in new investment for health care assets to meet the growing healthcare demands of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This will require the current level of investment in healthcare in developing markets to triple. What may be almost as important as the money itself, however, is the prospective opportunity to catalyze the entrepreneurial spirit that is seeping its way into African markets. Here we look at how this entrepreneurialism is being leveraged in the pharmacy and supply chain space.

empty pill bottles

Call a Spade a Spade: Venezuela is a Public Health Emergency

Health outcomes in Venezuela are approaching emergency-like levels as services, medicines, and food become increasingly inaccessible. Venezuela’s under-5 mortality rate in 2016 already rivaled Syria’s, a Grade 3 emergency according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Since then, Caritas has estimated that 11.4 percent of children under 5 in Venezuela suffer from moderate or severe acute malnutrition.

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